Minor Critical Discussion / Prynne in Other People’s Art

A. Alvarez, report under the editorial heading ‘Competition’. Tomorrow, 4 (1960): 12. [As a judge of the ‘TOMORROW’ Poetry Competition, Alvarez recommends that J.H. Prynne’s ‘The Hazel Tree’ [printed on p. 15 of the same issue] be included among ‘a couple of runners up […] But perhaps runners-up are not a good idea since I thought the general standard was extraordinarily high.’].

Theodore Enslin, [‘A FOOTNOTE . . . February 23.’] [letter to the editor in response to Prynne’s letter in Mica, 5]. Mica, 6 (June 1962): 2.

Larry Eigner, ‘From a letter…’ [letter to the editor, dated February 28 [1962], in response to Prynne’s letter in Mica, 5]. Mica, 6 (June 1962): 3. Reprinted as ‘Like a Dog Bark in Music’ in Larry Eigner, Areas Lights Heights: Writings 1954–1989, ed. Benjamin Friedlander (New York: Roof Books, 1989): 27. On p. 173 of Areas Lights Heights, among the ‘Editor’s Notes’, Friedlander gives the context of Eigner’s letter with a quote from Prynne’s letter in Mica, 5, and mentions that the new title has been added to Eigner’s letter for the publication of Areas Lights Heights, though it isn’t clear if the new title is Eigner’s or Friedlander’s. Eigner’s letter is also quoted in Friedlander’s ‘Editor’s Introduction’ to Areas Lights Heights, pp. v–vi [v].

J.C.A. Rathmell, ‘Paradigms for a Wider Concern’ [review of Force of Circumstance and Other Poems]. The Cambridge Review, (19 January 1963): 193–94.

Charles Olson, ‘The usefulness’, ‘OCEANIA,’ and ‘(LITERARY RESULT)’ [written on an unknown date in 1966, June 1966, and 18 October 1967, respectively] in his posthumous The Maximus Poems: Volume Three (New York: Viking/Grossman, 1975): 145–54 [150], 155–61 [157], and 184, respectively. Reprinted in Charles Olson, The Maximus Poems, ed. George Butterick (Berkeley, California: University of California Press, 1983): 528–37 [533], 538–44 [540], and 575, respectively. [‘The usefulness’ refers to ‘J. Prynne’; ‘OCEANIA,’ and ‘(LITERARY RESULT)’ both refer to ‘Jeremy Prynne’. The passages from these three poems that refer to Prynne are cited in Birgitta Johansson, The Engineering of Being: An Ontological Approach to J.H. Prynne (Ph.D. Dissertation, Umeå: Umeå University; Acta Universitatis Umensis, Umeå Studies in the Humanities, 135; 1997): 12; the context of ‘(LITERARY RESULT)’ is discussed on 73–75; and the influence Prynne and Olson had on each other’s work over their nearly decade-long correspondence, on 60–76 and 86–111].

Ian Vine, letter to TEI (25/5/66). The English Intelligencer, 1st ser., 7 (c. June 1966): 84–85. Reprinted in Certain Prose of The English Intelligencer, eds. Neil Pattison, Reitha Pattison and Luke Roberts (Cambridge: Mountain Press, 2012/2014 (2nd ed.)): 12–13. [Gripe critique of J.H. Prynne’s ‘Moon Poem’, published in the previous ‘issue’ (c. May 1966). Followed by John Hall’s response (4th June, 1966), The English Intelligencer, 1st ser., 7 (c. June 1966): 85–86, which is reprinted in Certain Prose of The English Intelligencer (Cambridge: Mountain Press, 2012/2014 (2nd ed.)): 13–15].

Edward Dorn, ‘A provisional fragment, congested with 3 titles’. Once: a one shot magazine, Vol. 1 No. 1 (1966; ed. Tom Clark, Brightlingsea, Essex): [n.p.] [pp. 2]. Reprinted in Edward Dorn, Collected Poems, ed. Jennifer Dunbar Dorn with Justin Katko, Reitha Pattison and Kyle Waugh (Manchester: Carcanet Press, 2012): 212–14 [212]. [As an epigraph, cites ‘“It is/ the battle of Maldon binds/ our feet”   J.H.P.’ [which is lines 14–16 of J.H. Prynne, ‘Song in Sight of the World’]].

Peter [Riley], letter to Andrew [Crozier] (January 29, 1967). The English Intelligencer, 1st ser., 13 (February 1967): 205–07. Reprinted in Certain Prose of The English Intelligencer, eds. Neil Pattison, Reitha Pattison and Luke Roberts (Cambridge: Mountain Press, 2012/2014 (2nd ed.)): 34–38. [The end of the letter discusses The English Intelligencer in relation to Prynne].

John [James], letter to Andrew [Crozier] (February 4, 1967). The English Intelligencer, 1st ser., 13 (February 1967): 207–09 [207]. Reprinted in Certain Prose of The English Intelligencer, eds. Neil Pattison, Reitha Pattison and Luke Roberts (Cambridge: Mountain Press, 2012/2014 (2nd ed.)): 38–40. [Quotes Prynne on MOR writers, ‘damn neat craftsmen’].

John Hall, letter to Andrew [Crozier] (18th February, 1967). The English Intelligencer, 1st ser., 14 (March 1967): 225–26 [226]. Reprinted in Certain Prose of The English Intelligencer, eds. Neil Pattison, Reitha Pattison and Luke Roberts (Cambridge: Mountain Press, 2012/2014 (2nd ed.)): 43–45. [Quotes Prynne on Hall’s ‘ROUTES 2’].

Ralph Maud, ‘from a letter’ (29th March 1967). The English Intelligencer, 2nd ser., 1 (April 1967): 286. Reprinted in Certain Prose of The English Intelligencer, eds. Neil Pattison, Reitha Pattison and Luke Roberts (Cambridge: Mountain Press, 2012/2014 (2nd ed.)): 103–04. [On Prynne and technology].

Barry MacSweeney, ‘An Answer, for What’, in ‘The Sparty Lea Festival Poems, March 21st to March 30th, 1967’. The English Intelligencer, 2nd ser., 2 (April 1967): 304. [Begins ‘Jeremy, Andrew, John.’].

Richard Holmes, ‘Poetry: inside history of small conflicts’ [review of, int. al., J.H. Prynne, Kitchen Poems]. The Times, [Issue 57290] (Saturday 29 June 1968): 25.

[Peter Riley], editor’s note. Collection, 2 (August 1968; ed. Peter Riley): 45. [Explains that the poems printed on pp. 45–47 [including J.H. Prynne, ‘The Corn Burned by Syrius’ on p. 46] were collected by Ray Crump and Geoffrey Hazard for the first issue of a magazine to be called ‘Little Wren’. ‘It proved impossible to issue the magazine, for financial reasons, and most of its contents are presented here.’].

Douglas Oliver, ‘Pioneer in Poetry’ [a review of J.H. Prynne, Kitchen Poems and Day  Light  Songs]. Cambridge Evening News, (10 August 1968): 6.

Peter Riley, editor’s note. Collection, 3 (January 1969; ed. Peter Riley): 37. [Explains that the poems on pp. 38–47 [including J.H. Prynne, ‘Air  Gap  Song’ on p. 46] were answers to a letter sent 7th December 1968. The letter, reproduced on p. 37, in part asks recipients to ‘please send me a poem, or other writing, of yours written during December […] Especially, if it were possible for you to send something which you consider to be indicative, or symptomatic, of WHERE, exactly WE (you), being “English” HAVE NOW GOT TO – I mean what are the concerns of a “poet” now, where are our hopes, what direction do you wish to point in? Or why anyway does anyone continue to write poetry & market it, to perform what function in or beyond this island? I ask this in the face of the obvious recent collapse of the “New American Poetry” syndrome as a means of support.’].

Peter Riley, ‘Missa Parodia Super Lucis Diei Cantiones Jeremiae Prinni’. 2R [Resuscitator, second series], [3:] The Last Resuscitator (January 1969; eds. John James and Nick Wayte): 15–28. [A prose ‘Note’ on p. 29 explains: ‘These poems should be read alongside day  light  songs by J.H. Prynne, on which they are based. […]’]. Later reprinted as Peter Riley, Strange Family (Providence, Rhode Island: Burning Deck, 1973). [A note at the end of that volume, [n.p.], expands upon this: ‘[…] The reader may care to consult day  light  songs by J. H. Prynne (Cambridge, R Books, 1968) of which the present work is an imitation or parody in terms mainly of sonic and lexical structures.’].

[Peter Riley and/or Lee Harwood], a note on the journal. Collection, 4 / Tzarad, 3 (April 1969; ed. Peter Riley / ed. Lee Harwood): [n.p., on the colophon/second page of the table of contents]. [Notes that Part C of the journal [pp. 41–66, including J.H. Prynne, ‘The Khirghiz Disasters’ and ‘The Friday Ballad’ on pp. 41–43 and 44, respectively] is Collection, 4 [ed. Peter Riley], while Parts A and B of the journal are the third and last issue of Tzarad [ed. Lee Harwood]].

Collective letter to the editor ‘From the Master of Gonville and Caius College and others’, ‘Source of great music’. The Times, [Issue 57577] (Wednesday 4 June 1969): 11. [A letter condemning the Governors of the B.B.C. for their proposal to close down Radio 3. The letter is signed by Prynne and nine others and is dated June 2].

Veronica Forrest-Thomson, ‘Epitaph for an Un-Named Priestess’. Solstice, 9 (1969; Cambridge): [unknown page numbers]. Reprinted in her Collected Poems and Translations, ed. Anthony Barnett (London, Lewes, and Berkeley: Allardyce, Barnett, Publishers, 1990): 253–54. Further reprinted in her Selected Poems, ed. Anthony Barnett (London: Invisible Books, 1999): 22–23. Further reprinted in her Collected Poems, ed. Anthony Barnett (Exeter: Shearsman Books; and Lewes: Allardyce Book, 2008): 65–66. Also online at http://www.kenyonreview.org/kr-online-issue/index-2/selections/veronica-forrest-thomson-for-readers/. [Neil Pattison, in ‘“The mirrors are tired of our faces”: Changing Subject in the Poetry of Veronica Forrest-Thomson’, Kenyon Review Online [c. 2009], online at the same webpage, notes that this poem is ‘in formal conversation with J.H. Prynne’s “A Gold Ring Called Reluctance” […] both through imitation […] by direct allusion; and by acute animadversions against Prynne’s positions.’].

Anthony Barnett, ‘Sumatran Rhinoceros: Preceded by Three Identical Letters’. Canards du siècle présent [English-language poetry anthology], ed. Anthony Barnett (Nivaa, Danmark: privately printed, February 1970): [n.p.] [A long poem that includes on one page a reference to ‘Mr Prynne’ and a quote [with line breaks added] from a letter sent by Prynne to Anthony Barnett in Denmark c. 1969: ‘[…] the whole culture, the dispersed | ghost of language, waits on these variable stabs at “arrangement” | which cannot as part of any strong hope for the whole be | merely the question of taste [&] acquaintance […]’].

Edward Dorn, ‘An Exercise’. Tansy, 1 (Spring 1970): 28. Reprinted in Edward Dorn, Collected Poems, ed. Jennifer Dunbar Dorn with Justin Katko, Reitha Pattison and Kyle Waugh (Manchester: Carcanet Press, 2012): 331–33. [Kyle Waugh, in News from Now/Here: Ed Dorn, Lawrence, Kansas, & the Poetics of Migration – 1965–1970 (Unpublished Masters Dissertation, University of Kansas, 2008): 470–71, states that this poem ‘routinely recounts a conversation in a bookstore between Dorn, Val Raworth, and Jeremy Prynne’].

Nick Totton, ‘The overcoat of Mr. Prynne’. The Fitzwilliam Magazine (1970): [27], in a four-page poetry supplement on pp. [27–30]. [The poetry supplement is intercalated in Dave Punter’s article ‘Cambridge Poetry’ on pp. 19–32].

Charles Olson, ‘The Art of Poetry No. 12’ [interview with Gerard Malanga]. Paris Review, No. 49 (Summer 1970): 176–204, online at http://www.theparisreview.org/interviews/4134/the-art-of-poetry-no-12-charles-olson, and reprinted in Beat Writers at Work (New York/Toronto: Modern Library, 1999): 134–56, is a flawed-to-the-point-of-apocryphal transcription of a recorded discussion between Olson, Gerard Malanga, Gerrit Lansing and Harvey Brown on 15 April 1969. ‘Paris Review Interview’, Ralph Maud’s more faithful transcription of four reels of the original audio recordings, is published in Charles Olson, Muthologos: The Collected Lectures and Interviews, ed. George Butterick (2 vols., Vol. II; Bolinas, California: Four Seasons Foundation, 1979): 105–53. That transcription, with an additional concluding fifth reel of recorded discussion, is reprinted with Ralph Maud’s handwritten corrections, notes and queries in Minutes of the Charles Olson Society, 47/48 (November 2002): 12–70; and subsequently a version incorporating Maud’s corrections and revisions is printed in Charles Olson, Muthologos: Lectures and Interviews, Revised Second Edition, ed. Ralph Maud (Vancouver: Talonbooks, 2010): 355–414, with a textual note on p. 459. [in ‘Paris Review Interview’ [the first Muthologos transcription and its subsequent revisions], Olson discusses int. al. his positive reaction to Prynne’s review of Maximus Poems IV, V, VI in The Park, 4/5 (Summer 1969): 64–66. Maud notes in Muthologos’s second edition, p. 459, that Maud received the original four reels of the recorded discussion ‘through the good offices of Jeremy Prynne’, while a fifth reel, housed in the Gerard Malanga Archive at the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, University of Texas at Austin, was transcribed by Charles Watts for publication in Minutes of the Charles Olson Society, 2 (June 1993): 28–37, and incorporated into Maud’s 2002 transcription with corrections and subsequently Muthologos’s second edition].

Tom McGauley, Brian Fawcett and John Scoggan, [untitled interview with Edward Dorn, in Vancouver, 22 July 1971]. The Peak, Vol. 18 No. 4 (Wednesday 4 August 1971): 8–9. [Stan Persky, Ralph Maud and Jeremy Prynne also join in the discussion]. Reprinted as ‘The Peak Interview’ in Edward Dorn, Two Interviews, eds. Gavin Selerie and Justin Katko (Bristol: Shearsman Books, 2012): 15–29.

Michael Long, review of BrassCambridge Review, Vol. 93 (19 November 1971): 62–63.

[anon. [Ed Dorn]], ‘Where Is Now?’. Bean News, [1] [1972; ed. Edward Dorn, San Francisco, Hermes Free Press and Zephyrus Image]: [4]. The full issue of Bean News, [1], is reprinted in Sagetrieb, Vol. 15 No. 3 (Winter 1996): [Supplement], [4]. The full issue of Bean News, [1], is further reprinted in Edward Dorn, Collected Poems, ed. Jennifer Dunbar Dorn with Justin Katko, Reitha Pattison and Kyle Waugh (Manchester: Carcanet Press, 2012): 915–22 [918]. The full issue of Bean News, [1], is also online at http://plantarchy.us/dorn/bean-news1.pdf. [‘Where Is Now?’ uses without attribution part of a sentence from Prynne’s letter to Ed Dorn, 9 May 1972. The part-sentence is: ‘“Extraordinary local effects” no doubt include negative gravitational anomaly and total isostatic disequilibrium’].

Ed Dorn, ‘from The Day & Night Book’, in All Stars, ed. Tom Clark (Santa Fe: Goliard / New York: Grossman, 1972): 101–31. Reprinted as Ed Dorn, from The Day & Night Book (Toronto: shuffaloff / Eternal Network Joint #6, February 2014). Further reprinted, as part of ‘The Day & Night Report’, in Edward Dorn, Derelict Air: From Collected Out, eds. Justin Katko and Kyle Waugh (London: Enitharmon Press, 2015): 221–302. ‘Day 92 – 273 days coming’ [103–04 in All Stars; 7–8 in from The Day & Night Book; and 247–48 in Derelict Air: From Collected Out] mentions ‘Cable (from Gonville, containing the Keys’; ‘181’ [131 in All Stars; 35 in from The Day & Night Book; and 268 in Derelict Air: From Collected Out] mentions ‘Fonetrak J.H. Prynne English Speaking Union Boston | No message | On set at Grolier bookshop | slow cello over the books’. [Further references to Prynne in ‘The Day & Night Report’ are noted in separate entries, below, based on the dates of their first publication [in 2012 and 2015]].

Iain Sinclair, The Birth Rug (London: Albion Village Press, 1973): [n.p.]. The epigraph to the first section of the book, ‘Birth Rug, Star Rug’, is by Prynne: ‘And I know the light is all bribery’ [the source is not given, though it’s from J.H. Prynne, ‘A Dream of Retained Colour’]. [There is also, among Peter Riley’s papers, a paragraph by Prynne, ‘on Iain Sinclair’s The Birth Rug (1973)’; its provenance has yet to be determined].

Edward Dorn, ‘An Interview with Roy K. Okada’. Contemporary Literature, Vol. 15 No. 3 (Summer 1974): 297–314 [312]. Reprinted in Edward Dorn, Interviews, ed. Donald Allen (Bolinas, California: Four Seasons Foundation, 1980): 36–58 [55]. [Dorn describes Prynne’s role in the creation of Bean News, [1] [1972; ed. Edward Dorn, San Francisco, Hermes Free Press and Zephyrus Image]].

John Seed, ‘J.H. Prynne’. Prospice, 2 (1974; eds. J.C.R. Green, Michael Edwards and Martin Booth): 57–66. In three parts: I. A Geography of the Will [‘The White Stones’ : Moments]; II. Into the Day : [‘Into the Day’]; and Afterword. [Extensive quotations from The White Stones and Into the Day are juxtaposed with divers apposite quotations from other sources].

Veronica Forrest-Thomson, ‘Cordelia: or, “A poem should not mean, but be”’, in Cordelia: or, ‘A poem should not mean, but be’ ([Leicester]: Omens Poetry Pamphlet, No. 2, 1974): 10–14. Reprinted in her On the Periphery (Cambridge: Street Editions, 1976): [[unknown page numbers] (in the section ‘Last Poems’)]. Reprinted in her Collected Poems and Translations, ed. Anthony Barnett (London, Lewes, and Berkeley: Allardyce, Barnett, Publishers, 1990): 104–09. Further reprinted in her Selected Poems, ed. Anthony Barnett (London: Invisible Books, 1999): 104–09. Further reprinted in her Collected Poems, ed. Anthony Barnett (Exeter: Shearsman Books; and Lewes: Allardyce Book, 2008): 152–57. [Contains several direct references to J.H. Prynne].

Robin Blaser, ‘Image-Nation 7 (l’air’ [c. 1971]. Image-Nations 1–12 & The Stadium of the Mirror (London: Ferry Press, 1974): 23–26 [24]. Reprinted in his The Holy Forest (Toronto: Coach House Press, 1993): 120–23 [121]. Further reprinted in his The Holy Forest: Collected Poems of Robin Blaser, Revised and Expanded Edition, ed. Miriam Nichols (Berkeley/Los Angeles/London: University of California Press, 2006): 159–63 [160]. [‘Jeremy Prynne explaining | the abstract     “it simply | means distance”’].

Peter Ackroyd, ‘Peter Ackroyd on some little English versifiers’ [review of, int. al., J.H. Prynne, Wound Response]. The Spectator, (4 January 1975): 13.

A. MacLean, ‘Archness and oddness’ [review of J. H. Prynne, Wound Response]. TLS [Times Literary Supplement], (1 August 1975): 866.

Martin Seymour-Smith, ‘Prynne, J(eremy) H(alvard)’. Contemporary Poets, 2nd edition, ed. James Vinson, assoc. ed. D.K. Kirkpatrick (London: St. James Press; and New York: St. Martin’s Press, 1975): 1214–15.

John James, ‘The Dragon House’. Striking the Pavilion of Zero (London: Ian McKelvie, 1975): 23–25. Reprinted in A Various Art, eds. Andrew Crozier and Tim Longville (Manchester: Carcanet Press, 1987): 154–56. ‘[…] discard The White Stones | open on the quilt at p.71 […]’.

Edward Dorn, ‘Book IIII’ of Gunslinger. First published in Edward Dorn, Slinger (Berkeley: Wingbow Press, 1975): [n.p.]; reprinted in Edward Dorn, Gunslinger (Durham, North Carolina and London: Duke University Press, 1989: 143–200 [147]; further reprinted in Edward Dorn, Collected Poems, ed. Jennifer Dunbar Dorn with Justin Katko, Reitha Pattison and Kyle Waugh (Manchester: Carcanet Press, 2012): 531–88 [535]). [Quotes Prynne’s ‘Only at the rim does the day tremble and shine’ (from ‘Of Movement Towards a Natural Place’) verbatim – with the exception, as Keston Sutherland points out (in ‘XL Prynne’, in A Manner of Utterance: The Poetry of J.H. Prynne, ed. Ian Brinton (Exeter: Shearsman Books, 2009): 130n61), of ‘a rather dizzyingly illustrative line break after “rim” and a still-Olsonian ampersand in place of the word “and”’. Also, Justin Katko, in ‘Relativistic Phytosophy: Towards a Commentary on “The Plant Time Manifold Transcripts”’ (Glossator: Practice and Theory of the Commentary, 2 (2010: On the Poems of J.H. Prynne; ed. Ryan Dobran): 245–93 [249–50]), presents evidence that the character of Jean Flamboyant is based on Prynne; though Tom Clark, in Edward Dorn: A World of Difference (Berkeley, California: North Atlantic Books, 2002): 15, advances an opposing claim. Yet a third is offered by Ed Dorn in ‘The Art of the Incisive’, Rolling Stock, 4 (February 1983): 2, reprinted in his Way West: Stories, Essays & Verse Accounts, 1963–1993 (Santa Rosa, California: Black Sparrow Press, 1993): 182–83 [183]. ‘Dr. Flamboyant’ appears also in Edward Dorn, ‘Dr. Flamboyant’ and [‘the Slinger peered thru the window’] [from ‘Gunslinger: Fragments & Satellites’ (1970–1974) [title attributed by the editors to a selection of the unpublished material written towards Gunslinger (1966–1975)]], and in ‘10 May 130’ and ‘163rd day 202 days follow’ [from ‘The Day & Night Report’ (1971)], all collected in Edward Dorn, Derelict Air: From Collected Out, eds. Justin Katko and Kyle Waugh (London: Enitharmon Press, 2015): 216 and 216, with notes on 566; and 258 and 261, with notes on 567].

Peter Ackroyd, ‘Verse, and worse?’ [review of, int. al., J.H. Prynne, High Pink on Chrome]. The Spectator, (20 December 1975): 793.

Donald Davie, Articulate Energy: An Enquiry into the Syntax of English Poetry, 2nd ed. (London: Routledge and Kegan Paul, 1976): [unknown page numbers; Prynne’s comments on John Riley cited in the 1975 preface].

Robert Young, ‘The Art of Flight: recent small press poetry’ [review of, int. al., the journal Perfect Bound, including discussion of J.H. Prynne]. Oxford Literary Review, Vol. 2 No. 1 (1977): 14–17 [16–17]. [Review, with quotes from J.H. Prynne, Into the Day, High Pink on Chrome, and ‘The Land of Saint Martin’].

Charles Olson and Edward Dorn, ‘Charles Olson and Edward Dorn’ [a 24 July 1965 discussion between the titular protagonists, filmed by Richard Moore as preliminary footage for his National Education Television segment on Olson in Gloucester, and then transcribed by Gordon Craig and partly corrected by George Butterick], in Charles Olson, Muthologos: The Collected Lectures and Interviews, ed. George Butterick (2 vols., Vol. I; Bolinas, California: Four Seasons Foundation, 1978): 157–68. Ralph Maud’s new transcription from the original audio and video recordings is published as ‘Reading at Berkeley – The Next Day’ in Minutes of the Charles Olson Society, 3 (October 1993): 6–14 [including Maud’s ‘Background to Berkeley – I’ on p. 5 and ‘Background to Berkeley – II’ on pp. 15–16]; and Maud’s new transcription, again lightly revised, is printed as ‘Reading at Berkeley – The Day After’ in Charles Olson, Muthologos: Lectures and Interviews, Revised Second Edition, ed. Ralph Maud (Vancouver: Talonbooks, 2010): 193–203. [Olson and Dorn discuss Prynne’s correspondence and characteristic research [158 in Muthologos’s first edition, 193–94 in Muthologos’s second edition]].

Charles Olson, ‘Olson in Gloucester, 1966’ [a transcription of selected outtakes from a filmed interview with Richard Moore, recorded from 11 to approx. 14 March 1966, transcribed by Gordon Craig and partly corrected by George Butterick. The edited film, without the section regarding J.H. Prynne, was broadcast as part of the National Education Television series USA: Poetry on the first week of September 1966, available online at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Dr_4xN4iZmM [first half of the segment] and https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3SeTGRfgfXk [second half of the segment]], in Charles Olson, Muthologos: The Collected Lectures and Interviews, ed. George Butterick (2 vols., Vol. 1; Bolinas, California: Four Seasons Foundation, 1978): 169–98 [184]. Ralph Maud’s new transcription from the video and the original film recordings is published as ‘Filming in Gloucester’ in Charles Olson, Muthologos: Lectures and Interviews, Revised Second Edition, ed. Ralph Maud (Vancouver: Talonbooks, 2010): 205–26 [214]. [Ralph Maud, in Muthologos’s second edition, p. 214n12, refers to Olson’s letter to Tom Clark of 7 March 1966 as evidence that the poem discussed in this interview was J.H. Prynne’s ‘Moon Poem’. Among the Charles Olson Papers, Archives and Special Collections at the Thomas J. Dodd Research Center, University of Connecticut Libraries, has been found a copy of ‘Moon Poem’ which includes Olson’s handwritten commentary, though the handwriting has yet to be deciphered to determine if it bears relation to the discussion in this interview].

Robert von Hallberg, Charles Olson: The Scholar’s Art (Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University Press, 1978): 244 [on shipping records et al. sent by Prynne to Charles Olson].

Edward Dorn, ‘Shifting an Interference with Nature to a Scientific Obstruction’, in Hello, La Jolla (Berkeley, California: Wingbow Press, 1978): 16. Reprinted in his Selected Poems, ed. Donald Allen (Bolinas, California: Grey Fox Press, 1978): 88. Further reprinted in his posthumous Way More West: New and Selected Poems, eds. Michael Rothenberg and Jennifer Dunbar Dorn (New York: Penguin Books, 2007): 185. Further reprinted in his Collected Poems, ed. Jennifer Dunbar Dorn with Justin Katko, Reitha Pattison and Kyle Waugh (Manchester: Carcanet Press, 2012): 601–02.

Robert Sheppard, ‘Reading Prynne and others’. Reality Studios, Vol. 2 No. 2 (1979): 25–27. Reprinted in his Far Language; Poetics and Linguistically Innovative Poetry, 1978–1997 (Exeter: Stride Research Documents, 1999 [2nd printing 2002]): [unknown page numbers].

Iain Sinclair, Suicide Bridge (London: Albion Village Press, 1979; reprinted in his Lud Heat / Suicide Bridge (London: Vintage, 1995)). [Prynne features as the character ‘Skofeld’].

Neil Powell, Carpenters of Light: Some Contemporary English Poets (Manchester: Carcanet New Press, 1979): 127–28. [Brief discussion of Prynne trying ‘to work difficult factual information from specialised prose writing into [his] poems…’, with a quote from ‘The Glacial Question, Unsolved’].

John James, A Former Boiling (1979): [unknown page numbers]. Reprinted in Collected Poems (Cambridge: Salt Publishing, 2002): [unknown page numbers]. [‘JHP and Siouxie-Sioux make the feathered jump to Hyper Space’].

Bernard Dubourg, ‘Quelques propositions a traduire for fancy-readers’. Grosseteste Review, 12 (1979): 76–83 [82–83]. [In French, with English translation by Peter Riley on facing pages. From the translation: ‘To translate is a state, not an act: the state of progression towards a final point already posited. I have often wanted to amend the original; J.H. Prynne has consented once or twice to such corrections: for the rest only dead authors are assailed.’].

Anne Stevenson, ‘All their little ones’ [review of, int. al., J.H. Prynne, Down where changed]. TLS [Times Literary Supplement], (23 May 1980): 586.

Tom Clark, 16 October 1979 interview conducted by Edward Dorn. Little Caesar, 11 (1980): 188–217 [192, 194]. [Discusses, int. al., Tom Clark’s time at Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge: ‘I studied Verse Tragedy with Jeremy Prynne […] [who] had the best library I’d ever seen of the poetry we’re talking about – Black Mountain specifically. He had Divers Press publications, he had Origin, he had the Black Mountain Review, and all the important books. And of course he had Olson, and was in the process of working on Olson’s papers. And he had your [Dorn’s] books […] Jeremy was seeing [Dorn’s] work in terms of a literary movement with which he was familiar […]’].

Anthony Barnett, ‘A View from the Kingdom’ [essay printed separately for distribution, as an insert, with his A White Mess (London: The Literary Supplement, Nothing doing (formally in London), 1981)]: [n.p.] [pp. 4]. [‘A poem by J.H. Prynne is remarkably | useful.’].

Robert Nye, ‘Poet of a living modernism’. The Times, [Issue 61339] (Thursday 16 September 1982): 6.

Peter Porter, review of J.H. Prynne, Poems [1982]. The Observer (23 January 1983): 47.

Out To Lunch [Ben Watson], ‘In Respect of Rubbish: Out To Lunch on 200 Motels’. Society Pages [Norwegian Frank Zappa fanzine], 11 (July 1982): [unknown page numbers]. Reprinted in The Frank Zappa Companion: Four Decades of Commentary, ed. Richard Kostelanetz (New York: Schirmer Books, 1997): 103–13. Partially reproduced online at http://www.militantesthetix.co.uk/zappo/Rubbish/iror.html [approx. pp. 11], in altered layout.

Nigel Wheale, ‘Sequentially Scientific’ [review of J.H. Prynne, Poems [1982]]. TLS [Times Literary Supplement], (24 June 1983): 661.

I. Hughes, review of J.H. Prynne, Poems[1982]. Poetry Wales, Vol. 18 No. 3 (1983): 39–42.

John Matthias, ‘Chariots of Verse: Notes on the 1983 Biennial Cambridge Poetry Festival’. Rolling Stock, 5 (June 1983): 11, 21, 22. [ends with a note: ‘Significantly enough, the two most important Cambridge poets (two of the most important poets anywhere, despite their enormous differences) chose – and indeed regularly do choose – not to attend the festival: Jeremy Prynne and Geoffrey Hill. Such silence from such poets has its own undeniable eloquence and appeal.’].

George Butterick, ‘Editor’s Afterword’, in Charles Olson, The Maximus Poems, ed. George Butterick (Berkeley, California: University of California Press, 1983): 637–45 [638, 641]. [Mentions a typescript of Olson’s Maximus Poems IV, V, VI prepared by Prynne in 1964 for a proposed but never published Corinth Books edition].

Ed Dorn, ‘Salients’. Rolling Stock, 7 (May 1984): 21. [Includes, among capsule book reviews, a brief appraisal of The Oval Window: ‘In Vivo vocabulary. Great Britain’s premier skald trims the sizarships right through the drift.’].

Ed Dorn, ‘Salients’. Rolling Stock, 8 (October 1984): 23. [Includes, among others, a capsule review of Grosseteste Review, Vol. 15: ‘Its present form is 263 pp of Very Interesting matter, not least of which is a long letter on some aspects of the art of poetry by J. H. Prynne.’].

Robert von Hallberg, American Poetry and Culture 1945–1980 (Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University Press, 1985): 227 [on Ed Dorn and Prynne].

Woody Haut, ‘Obscurantics’. Rolling Stock, 12 (October 1986): 2. [Letter to the editor criticising Prynne’s letters to the editor].

Ed Dorn, ‘Salients’. Rolling Stock, 12 (October 1986): 25. [Includes capsule review of New Songs from a Jade Terrace [1986 edition], translated with annotations by Anne Birrell, postscript essay by Jeremy Prynne].

Out To Lunch [Ben Watson], So Much Plotted Freedom: the cost of employing the language of fetishized domination – Poodle Play explores the sex economy of Henry James’ lingo jingo. (London: Reality Studios, Occasional Paper, No. 6 (1987), printed by Bob Cobbing on the Writers Forum photocopier). Online at http://www.militantesthetix.co.uk/critlit/smpf/SMPFtxt.htm [approx. pp. 40; short discussion of Prynne, int. al.].

Ed Dorn, ‘Salients Now Incorporating Bondage Cookery’. Rolling Stock, 14 (October 1987): 26. [Beneath an unsigned drawing captioned ‘J.H.P. in Cambridge’, quotes from Out To Lunch [Ben Watson], So Much Plotted Freedom: the cost of employing the language of fetishized domination – Poodle Play explores the sex economy of Henry James’ lingo jingo (London: Reality Studios, Occasional Paper, No. 6 (1987)) on the poetry of J.H. Prynne; followed by a notice on the publication of J.H. Prynne, Bands Around the Throat – ‘Seventeen cauldrons of highly refined synthetic wax poured on the stormers of the ramparts’; followed by J.H. Prynne, ‘Fool’s Bracelet’ presented in full].

Peter Ackroyd, ‘Legislators of Language’ [review of A Various Art, eds. Andrew Crozier and Tim Longville]. The Times (3 December 1987): [unknown page numbers]. [includes the oft-quoted assessment, ‘J.H. Prynne […] is without doubt the most formidable and accomplished poet in England today, a writer who has single-handedly changed the vocabulary of expression, and who, through his teaching at Cambridge, has re-educated the sensibility of an entire generation of students.’].

Charles Bernstein, ‘Prynne’s Poetry’ [letter to David Marriott, sometime between 1988–1995]. Charles Bernstein Correspondence Box 39 Folder 10, Mandeville Special Collections Library, University of California, San Diego [catalogued online at http://cdn.calisphere.org/data/13030/0f/kt896nd20f/files/kt896nd20f.pdf].

Joel Lewis, ‘Sons of Their Skins: Adventures in British Dissonance… a survey of recent developments in the poetry of the United Kingdom’ [review of, int. al., J.H. Prynne, Poems [1982]]. The Poetry Project, 129 (Summer 1988): [n.p.] [pp. 3].

Robert Kelly, review of Matières D’Angleterre: Anthologie bilingue de la Nouvelle Poésie Anglaise, eds. Pierre Joris and Paul Buck (Amiens: Trois Cailloux, 1984 [published as In’hui, 19 [journal edited by Jacques Darras]]). Notus, Vol. 3 No. 1 (Spring 1988): 95. [‘What you’ll find: some of the most interesting poets writing in any language these days – J.H. Prynne, Allen Fisher, Tom Raworth, whose work challenges our convenient separation of intellectual from lyrical occasions. These whole persons are discoursefully inventing a world that will be there when the words are down.’].

Anthony Barnett, ‘Arts Council Grants’ [letter to the editor of London Review of Books]. London Review of Books, Vol. 11 No. 8 (20 April 1989): letters page. Online at http://www.lrb.co.uk/v11/n08/letters#letter7 [approx. pp. 1]. [Notes that the Arts Council of England refused Allardyce, Barnett’s application for funding, informing Barnett that ‘assistance would not be available unless [they] published a different kind of poet, although those [they] have already published, including J.H. Prynne, Andrew Crozier and Douglas Oliver, were praised.’].

T.J.G. Harris, review of, int. al., New Songs from a Jade Terrace [1986 edition], translated with annotations by Anne Birrell, postscript essay by Jeremy Prynne. PN Review, Vol. 15 No. 5 [67] (May–June 1989): [unknown page numbers].

Michael Schmidt, Reading Modern Poetry (London and New York: Routledge, 1989): 29.

Andrew Lawson, The Purloined Letter (Hebden Bridge: Open Township, 1989). [Italicised passages in the poem are quotations from Prynne’s ‘Letter to Andrew Duncan’].

‘Grex’. Oxford English Dictionary, 2nd ed. (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1989). [Term coined by Prynne in discussions with B.M. Shaffer at Cambridge, first used by Shaffer in Advances in Morphogenesis, Vol. 2, eds. M. Abercrombie and Jean Brachet (New York: Academic Press, 1962): 112, 162; later used by P.A. Farnsworth and L. Wolpert in ‘Absence of Cell Sorting Out in the Grex of the Slime Mould Dictyostelium discoideum’. Nature, Vol. 231 No. 5301 (4 June 1971): 329–30; and also in the 1978 remake of Invasion of the Body Snatchers, directed by Philip Kaufman, written by W.D. Richter based on the 1955 novel The Body Snatchers by Jack Finney].

Frank Kermode, ‘Yesterday’ [review of Bryan Appleyard, The Pleasures of Peace: Art and Imagination in Post-War Britain (London: Faber and Faber, 1989)]. London Review of Books, Vol. 11 No. 14 (27 July 1989): 14. Online, partly, at http://www.lrb.co.uk/v11/n14/frank-kermode/yesterday [access to the full article requires subscription].

Stephen Ellis, ‘J.H. Prynne, Bands Around the Throat’ [review]. Notus, Vol. 4 No. 2 (Fall 1989): 90–91.

James Smithson, ‘Value-Judgment’ [letter to the editor of London Review of Books]. London Review of Books, Vol. 11 No. 17 (14 September 1989): letters page. Online at http://www.lrb.co.uk/v11/n17/letters#letter7 [approx. pp. 1]. [Takes issue with Frank Kermode’s restatement of Bryan Appleyard’s assessment of Prynne as ‘the most comprehensively gifted of living British poets’].

Anthony Barnett, ‘Value-Judgment’ [letter to the editor of London Review of Books]. London Review of Books, Vol. 11 No. 19 (12 October 1989): letters page. Online at http://www.lrb.co.uk/v11/n19/letters#letter4 [approx. pp. 1]. [Riposte to James Smithson’s letter to the editor on 14 September 1989].

Douglas Oliver, An Island That Is All the World, in his Three Variations on a Theme of Harm (London: Paladin, 1990): 37–109 [100] [describes Prynne’s rune poem and its significance to Oliver. The subject is further discussed in Justin Katko, ‘Regarding a Specimen of Palaeobotanic Epigraphy: J.H. Prynne’s Runic Fertility Prayer’. If A Then B, 1 (August 2010: Notes on Translation; Berlin): 42–59].

Iain Sinclair, Downriver; (Or, The Vessels of Wrath) (London: Paladin, 1991): 130, 311 [mentions Prynne’s correspondence with Nicholas Moore, c. 1973].

John James, ‘The Conversation’, in Dreaming Flesh (Cambridge: Street Editions, 1991): 2–4. Reprinted in Conductors of Chaos; A Poetry Anthology, ed. Iain Sinclair (London: Picador, 1996): 173–74 [174 addresses ‘Jeremy’ among Wordsworth quotes].

T.R. Langley, ‘Shakespeare: Dream and Tempest’. Cambridge Quarterly, Vol. 20 No. 2 (1991): 118–37 [136]. [Quotes one sentence from an unpublished lecture by J.H. Prynne on ‘The Elizabethan Lyric’].

Edward Dorn with Kevin Bezner, ‘An Interview by Kevin Bezner’. The American Poetry Review, Vol. 21 No. 5 (September/October 1992): 43–46. Reprinted in Ed Dorn Live: Lectures, Interviews, and Outtakes, ed. Joseph Richey (Ann Arbor, Michigan: University of Michigan Press, 2007): 69–77. [Dorn discusses writing ‘The Cycle’ from Gunslinger at the time of reading the skaldics and other material shown to him by Prynne].

Peter Riley, Reader (London: [n.p.], 1992): [n.p.] [pp. 24]. [Quotation by Prynne, dated 15th September 1985, as epigraph, on p. [4]: ‘It has mostly been my own aspiration, for example, to establish relations not personally with the reader, but with the world and its layers of shifted but recognisable usage; and thereby with the reader’s own position within this world.’].

Ben Watson [Out To Lunch], Frank Zappa: The Negative Dialectics of Poodle Play (London: Quartet Books, 1993; [with added Postfix to the Fourth Edition] New York: St. Martin’s Griffin, 1996): xxi, 27, 47, 95, 184, 187, 218, 226, 274, 325, 360, 534, 566, 572. [Quotes of Prynne and anecdotes; seminal].

Drew Milne, ‘Agoraphobia, and the embarrassment of manifestos: notes towards a community of risk’. Parataxis: modernism and modern writing, 3 (1993; ed. Drew Milne): 25–40. Reprinted in Jacket, 20 (December 2002), online at http://jacketmagazine.com/20/pt-dm-agora.html [approx. pp. 10].

Drew Milne, ‘Cottage Industries and Agoraphobia: further notes on risk’. Parataxis: modernism and modern writing, 4 (1993; ed. Drew Milne): 58–69. Reprinted in Jacket, 20 (December 2002), online at http://jacketmagazine.com/20/pt-dm-cott.html [approx. pp. 14].

Drew Milne, ‘A still life in blue’, in Sheet Mettle (London: Alfred David Editions, 1994): 39–42. Reprinted in Drew Milne, The Damage: New and Selected Poems (Cambridge: Salt, 2001): 14–17. [A poem in dialogue with Prynne, quoting from Prynne’s letter to Milne on 21st March 1993 which had been published as ‘J.H. Prynne/Drew Milne: Some letters’. Parataxis: modernism and modern writing, 5 (Winter 1993–94; ed. Drew Milne): 56–62 [57–62]].

Kris Long, letter about The Oval WindowParataxis: modernism and modern writing, 5 (Winter 1993–94; ed. Drew Milne): 89–90. [Long, a database analyst, glosses some of the computer jargon in the poem].

Iain Sinclair, Radon Daughters; A voyage, between art and terror, from the Mound of Whitechapel to the limestone pavements of the Burren (London: Jonathan Cape, 1994). [Prynne features as the character ‘Simon Undark’].

Zhou Yaping, ‘Letter to J.H. Prynne’ [28 July 1991]. Original: Chinese Language-Poetry Group, translated by Jeff Twitchell-Waas, ed. J.H. Prynne (Brighton: Parataxis Editions, 1994; as Parataxis: modernism and modern writing, 7 (Spring 1995; general ed. Drew Milne)): 100–101. Reprinted in Jacket, 20 (December 2002), online at http://jacketmagazine.com/20/pt-chinese.html#zho-pro [approx. pp. 3].

Iain Sinclair, ‘Vermin Correspondence’ [review of Ben Watson, Frank Zappa: The Negative Dialectics of Poodle Play and J.H. Prynne, Her Weasels Wild Returning]. London Review of Books (20 October 1994): 41–42.

Ben Watson [Out To Lunch], ‘Iain Sinclair: Revolutionary Novelist or Revolting Nihilist?’ [c. 1994], online at http://www.militantesthetix.co.uk/critlit/SINCLAIR.htm [approx. pp. 23; short discussion of Sinclair’s selective quotations of Prynne].

Robert Sheppard, ‘Artifice and the everyday world: Poetry in the 1970s’, in The Arts in the 1970s: Cultural Closure?, ed. Bart Moore-Gilbert (London: Routledge, 1994): 129–51. [Includes a discussion of Prynne in the context of Peter Ackroyd’s and Veronica Forrest-Thomson’s books].

Michael Haslam, A Whole Bauble (Manchester: Carcanet Press, 1995): 260. [Identifies as a ‘wayward Prynneite’].

Ralph Maud, Charles Olson’s Reading: A Biography (Carbondale and Edwardsville: Southern Illinois University Press, 1996): 153–56, 169, 175, 178, 180–81, 184, 190, 194, 305–06, 316, 319–20, 329. [Includes detailed records of the books, journals and various extracts Prynne sent to Olson between 1962 and 1968, based upon Olson’s marginalia in his personal library and on contemporaneous letters to and from Olson. Also traces Olson’s use of various materials in his poetry and prose. Mentions packages or letters received from Prynne on 3 October 1962 [p. 306], October 1962 [305–06], 2 January 1964 [155], 24 July 1964 [306], 18 December 1965 [175], 14 February 1966 [306], 29 March 1966 [178], June 1966 [194], 27 June 1966 [156], 29 July 1966 [180], 18 August 1966 [181], and 29 February 1968 [156] – though other materials from Prynne are mentioned without dates included, and much else of Prynne and Olson’s correspondence is not covered].

Ian Gregson, Contemporary Poetry and Postmodernism; Dialogue and Estrangement (London: Macmillan, 1996): Chapter 11, ‘A Various Art: Veronica Forrest-Thomson and Denise Riley’ (192–208); and p. 263.

Philip Gross, ‘Use Your Loaf’ [review of N.H. Reeve and Richard Kerridge, Nearly Too Much: The Poetry of J.H. Prynne (Liverpool: Liverpool University Press, 1996)]. Poetry Review, Vol. 86 No. 2 (Summer 1996): 20–22.

Drew Milne, ‘A brief response: at the risk of being misunderstood’. Parataxis: modernism and modern writing, 8/9 (1996; ed. Drew Milne): 213–15.

Charles Bernstein, et. al., ‘On Poetry, Language, and Teaching: A Conversation with Charles Bernstein’. boundary 2, Vol. 23 No. 3 (Fall 1996): 45–66 [58ff.].

Peter Hughes, review of Barry MacSweeney, Pearl (Cambridge: Equipage, 1995). Angel Exhaust, 14 (Winter 1996; ed. Andrew Duncan): [unknown page numbers], online at http://www.pinko.org/92.html [approx. pp. 4]. [notes that Prynne typeset Barry MacSweeney’s poetic sequence Pearl].

‘Edgar Allen Poe’ [Ben Friedlander], ‘J.H. Prynne, a review’ [of Not-You]. Raddle Moon, 15 (c. 1996): 135–42.

BRITISH-IRISH-POETS Archives, online at https://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/cgi-bin/webadmin?A1=ind97&L=british-irish-poets&F=&S=&O=D&H=0&D=0&T=1 [1 February 1997 – 30 December 1997; essentially an early version of the UKPOETRY listserv, previously online at http://listserv.muohio.edu/archives/UKPOETRY.html (April 2001 – May 2014)].

Iain Sinclair, Lights Out for the Territory; 9 Excursions in the Secret History of London (London: Granta, 1997): 131–32 [‘A Vatican of periodicals came into being with no purpose beyond reinterpreting (muddying with exegesis) the minutiae of the Prynne oeuvre […]’, et. al.]; also p. 239 [‘The last “shamanic” text that was in any way respectable was JH Prynne’s Aristeas, In Seven Years (Ferry Press, 1968), underwritten as it was by genuine and visible scholarship. […]’ Sinclair also quotes lines 3–7 of Aristeas’s second numbered section].

Barry MacSweeney, ‘Pearl Against the Barbed Wire’. The Book of Demons (Newcastle upon Tyne: Bloodaxe Books, 1997): 68–71 [70]. [‘before | either of us knew where was the Orient, before | Jeremy travelled there’].

John Wilkinson, ‘Men’s Work: The Poems of Tony Lopez and Nigel Wheale’ [review of Tony Lopez, Stress Management and Other Poems (The Boldface Press, 1994) and Nigel Wheale, Phrasing the Light (The Many Press, 1994)]. fragmente, 7 (1997): 138–48 [144–45] [Contrasts Wheale’s poems with ‘their models in early Edward Dorn and J H Prynne’].

Marjorie Perloff, ‘What We Don’t Talk About When We Talk About Poetry: Some Aporias of Literary Journalism’. PN Review, Vol. 23 No. 5 [115] (May–June 1997): 17–25. Reprinted in Grub Street and the Ivory Tower: Literary Journalism and Literary Scholarship from Fielding to the Internet, eds. Jeremy Treglown and Bridget Bennett (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1998): 224–49. Online at http://marjorieperloff.com/stein-duchamp-picasso/aporias/ [approx. pp. 8].

Andrew Duncan, ‘Speculations on the outlines of a generation born in the sixties’. Angel Exhaust, 15 (Autumn 1997; ed. Andrew Duncan): [unknown page numbers], online at http://www.pinko.org/60.html [approx. pp. 18].

The Cockerell Library & The Royal Visit: 7 July 1997 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1997): [n.p. [9–11]]. [Features six photographs of J.H. Prynne with His Royal Highness Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh, KG, KT, alongside library and college staff, a computer system benefactor, and an undergraduate student. Reprinted from The Caian [further details unknown]. The royal visit marked the opening of Gonville and Caius College’s Cockerell Library. The photos are by George Shiffner, Ben Schott and Neville Taylor. The caption for the first of the six photographs reads ‘In the Library the Prince was greeted by the Librarian, Mr J.H. Prynne, here shown expounding one of the Library’s treasures to the Prince: a rare early 16th-century music manuscript.’].

Michael Schmidt, ‘Elaine Feinstein in Conversation’. PN Review, Vol. 24 No. 2 [118] (November–December 1997): 36–41. Online at http://www.elainefeinstein.com/PNR-interview.pdf [pp. 13].

Devin Johnston, review of Douglas Oliver, Selected Poems (Jersey City, New Jersey: Talisman House, Publishers, 1996). Chicago Review, Vol. 43 No. 1 (Winter 1997): 111–14 [112]. Excerpted online at https://www.questia.com/library/journal/1P3-11354578/selected-poems, with comparisons between Prynne and Oliver.

Nicholas Johnson, ‘Bill Griffiths’. Lynx: Poetry from Bath, 4 (February 1998; ed. Douglas Clark), online at http://www.dgdclynx.plus.com/lynx/lynx44.html [approx. pp. 5]. ‘Most of the Cambridge school, if they still write at all, carry the mantle of distaste for public readings inherited from J.H.Prynne who last read in England in 1968 when Tom Pickard advised him that he “read like a fucking dalek”.’ [Referencing Jeff Nuttall, ‘Bill Griffiths – an appreciation’. Poetry Information, 15 (1976; ed. Peter Hodgkiss): 13–17].

Keith Tuma, Fishing By Obstinate Isles: Modern and Postmodern British Poetry and American Readers (Evanston, Illinois: Northwestern University Press, 1998): 15, 28, 41, 49, 53, 68, 115, 135, 201–203, 205, 211, 214, 233, 276.

Drew Milne, Bench Marks (London: Alfred David, 1998): [unknown page number]. [‘Bring me another pot | of sanguine fire […]’].

Charles Bernstein, ‘Introduction’ to Close Listening: Poetry and the Performed Word, ed. Charles Bernstein (New York: Oxford University Press, 1998): 3–26 [17]. This essay is subsequently adapted into Charles Bernstein, ‘Close Listening: Poetry and the Performed Word’, in My Way; Speeches and Poems (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1999): 279–301 [294–95]. [Briefly discusses J.H. Prynne, Stars, Tigers and the Shape of Words].

Iain Sinclair, et al., ‘Culture: Books of the Year’. Independent on Sunday, (4 December 1999): [unknown page numbers]. Online at http://www.independent.co.uk/arts-entertainment/culture-books-of-the-year-1130258.html. [Sinclair includes Prynne’s Poems [1999] among the year’s best books].

Peter Middleton, ‘The Contemporary Poetry Reading’. Close Listening: Poetry and the Performed Word, ed. Charles Bernstein (New York: Oxford University Press, 1998): 262–99 [269–70, 285]. [Brief discussion of the effect of endnotes on ‘Aristeas, in Seven Years’ in ‘staking a claim to be heard’, and of Stars, Tigers and the Shape of Words’s argument against ‘literary theory’s reliance on the Saussurean paradigm’].

Michael Schmidt, Lives of the Poets (London: Weidenfeld & Nicolson, 1998): 667–69.

‘Stewart Home’, ‘Proletarian Post-Modernism’. Suspect Device, ed. Stewart Home (London: Serpent’s Tail, 1998): 53–60 [60]. [The ‘collective pseudonym’ ‘Stewart Home’ wrote two ‘phantom introductions’ to the anthology edited and introduced by Stewart Home and arranged them into two running columns. Near the end of the lefthand introduction, we learn that ‘All the writers represented in this anthology are acting out a surreal existentialism. This consists of living in run-down apartments, drinking day and night, cross-dressing or wearing clothing from the nearest Salvation Army shop and reciting J. H. Prynne’s Brass several times a day while standing bollock naked on whatever balcony affords the greatest audience. Anything less would be unacceptable, since I am not interested in the processed prose of show-business sell-outs.’]. Also online at https://www.stewarthomesociety.org/sex/prolmo.htm.

M[ichael] Stone-Richards, ‘Introduction to “From Après-coup to passé anachronique”: An Intervention by Pierre Fédida’. fragmente, 8 (Summer 1998): 31–34. Introduces Pierre Fédida, ‘From Après-coup to passé anachronique’, translated by Stone-Richards on pp. 35–38. [In a footnote to his Introduction, Stone-Richards asks, ‘Dare I point out that, though we all are well familiar with the importance of phenomenology to Prynne’s poetics, scarcely any worthwhile work has been done on the manner in which he uses this phenomenology in relation to late nineteenth-century neurology? This issue is far from negligible as the current historiographic re-writing of the relations between Jacksonian neurology and the origins of psychoanalysis shows. […]’. This note prefigures Stone-Richards’s later treatment of the subject in his essay ‘The time of the subject in the neurological field (I): A Commentary on J.H. Prynne’s “Again in the Black Cloud”’ and ‘Appendix: The time of the subject in the neurological field (II): A Note on Breton in the Light of Prynne’. Glossator: Practice and Theory of the Commentary, 2 (2010: On the Poems of J.H. Prynne; ed. Ryan Dobran): 149–244. Online at https://solutioperfecta.files.wordpress.com/2011/10/g2-msr.pdf].

D.S. Marriott, ‘Naming Witches’. fragmente, 8 (Summer 1998): 56–66 [66]. [A footnote discusses shamanism in J.H. Prynne, ‘Aristeas, in Seven Years’ in relation to the philosophy behind Charles Olson’s projective verse].

Anthony Mellors, ‘Maximal Extent: Charles Olson and C.G. Jung’. fragmente, 8 (Summer 1998): 67–90 [82–85, 87–88]. [Discusses Prynne’s ‘Review of Charles Olson, Maximus Poems IV, V, VI’ and his 1971 Simon Fraser University lecture ‘On Maximus IV, V, VI’].

Douglas Oliver, ‘Andrew Crozier’s Perceptions’. fragmente, 8 (Summer 1998): 107–17. [Poetic comparisons between Crozier and Prynne, with much philosophical and biographical context, int. al.].

Douglas Clark, ‘J. H. Prynne’. Lynx: Poetry from Bath, 7 (September 1998; ed. Douglas Clark), online at http://www.dgdclynx.plus.com/lynx/lynx75.html [approx. pp. 1].

Leo Mellor, ‘The amazing Mr. Prynne’ [review of Poems [1999]]. Buzzwords (1999), online at http://www.buzzwords.ndo.co.uk/mellor/poems.html [approx. pp. 3].

Vernon Scannell, ‘Triumph of form over content’ [review of J.H. Prynne, Poems [1999]]. Sunday Telegraph (London) (7 February 1999): [unknown page numbers].

Rachel Campbell-Johnston, ‘Poems with good posture’ [review of J.H. Prynne, Poems [1999]]. The Times (22 April 1999): [unknown page numbers].

Robert Potts, ‘Searching for Mr Prynne: A poet who can no longer hide his talents’ [review of J.H. Prynne, Poems [1999]]. The Guardian (24 July 1999): News p. 10.

Phil Johnson, ‘War, cancer and other ills’. The Independent (4 August 1999): [unknown page numbers]. [A report on a 1999 reading by Ed Dorn, at which Prynne gave his first public reading of his own work since 1971. This reading is likewise discussed by Iain Sinclair and Ed Dorn in ‘The Last Interviews’, in Ed Dorn Live: Lectures, Interviews, and Outtakes, ed. Joseph Richey (Ann Arbor: University of Michigan, 2007): 153–67 [167]].

Michael Glover, ‘Not a recluse in the pub’ [review of J.H. Prynne, Poems [1999]]. The Independent (22 August 1999): [13?].

Ramez Qureshi, review of J.H. Prynne, Poems [1999]. Read Me, 1 (Fall 1999): online at http://home.jps.net/~nada/prynne.htm [approx. pp. 4].

John Whitworth, ‘Crop-Eared Sonnet’ [in the series The Sonnet History]. Poetry Review, Vol. 89 No. 3 (Autumn 1999): 63. [A parody. The title alludes to the punishment meted out to Prynne’s 17th-c. ancestor, William Prynne].

Mark Rotella, review of J.H. Prynne, Poems [1999]. Publishers Weekly, Vol. 246 No. 39 (27 September 1999): 100.

[anon.], ‘Now available outside Cambridge’ [review of J.H. Prynne, Poems [1999]]. The Daily Telegraph (2 October 1999), Books Section: [4?]. Online at http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/4718560/Now-available-outside-Cambridge.html.

Richard Caddel and Peter Quartermain, ‘Introduction – A Fair Field Full of Folk’, in Other: British and Irish Poetry since 1970, eds. Richard Caddel and Peter Quartermain (Hanover, New Hampshire and London, England: Wesleyan University Press, 1999): xv–xxix [xxv–xxvii]. [Notes that Prynne’s work is not included in the anthology].

Charles Bernstein, ‘Close Listening: Poetry and the Performed Word’, in My Way; Speeches and Poems (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1999): 279–301 [294–95]. This essay is adapted from Bernstein’s ‘Introduction’ to Close Listening: Poetry and the Performed Word, ed. Charles Bernstein (New York: Oxford University Press, 1998): 3–26 [17]. [Briefly discusses J.H. Prynne, Stars, Tigers and the Shape of Words].

Adam Phillips, et al., ‘It’s been a pleasure…’ [Best Books of the Year]. The Observer (28 November 1999): 1–3 [2]. [Phillips includes J.H. Prynne, Poems [1999] among the year’s best books].

Robert Sheppard, ‘Elsewhere and Everywhere.. other new (British) poetries’ [review of Conductors of Chaos, ed. Iain Sinclair, and Out of Everywhere, ed. Maggie O’Sullivan]. Lynx: Poetry from Bath, 13 (December 1999; ed. Douglas Clark), online at http://www.dgdclynx.plus.com/lynx/lynx1310.html [approx. pp. 11].

Iain Sinclair, et al., ‘Culture: Books of the Year’. Independent on Sunday, (4 December 1999): [unknown page numbers]. Online at http://www.independent.co.uk/arts-entertainment/culture-books-of-the-year-1130258.html. [Sinclair includes J.H. Prynne, Poems [1999] among the year’s best books].

Jim Sheeler, ‘A Gunslinger of Words: Edward Dorn, 1929–1999’. Boulder Planet, Vol. 4 No. 25 (22–28 Dec 1999): 1, 8. [An obituary of Ed Dorn which includes part of Prynne’s eulogy].

John Matthias, ‘British Poetry at Y2K’. Electronic Book Review [ebr], 10 (Winter 1999/2000), online at http://www.altx.com/ebr/ebr10/10mat.htm [approx. pp. 35]; also online at http://www.electronicbookreview.com/thread/electropoetics/exhaustive, where it is claimed that the article was posted in early 1997, but one of the books reviewed was published in 1999.

David Wheatley, ‘Never Apologize, Never Explain’ [review of J.H. Prynne, Poems [1999] and Peter Redgrove, Selected Poems]. The Poetry Ireland Review, 64 (Spring 2000): 114–18.

Brian McHale, ‘Brit-Pop, or, Bringing It All Back Home: On Andrew Greig’s Western Swing’. Yale Journal of Criticism, Vol. 13 No. 1 (Spring 2000): 195–205 [201]. [‘However it is to be explained, the fact remains that few American poems register even the faintest traces of Gunslinger’s impact […] while several major British poems owe their poetics in large measure to Dorn, including Jeremy Prynne’s “Of Sanguine Fire” […]’].

Steve McCaffery, ‘A Belated Reply to H.J. Prynne [sic]’. The Gig, 6 (July 2000): 14. [A reply to Prynne’s letter in the form of a poem].

Keith Tuma, ‘Ed Dorn and England’. The Gig, 6 (July 2000): 41–54. [discusses ‘The Plant Time Manifold Transcripts’].

Charles Olson, Selected Letters, ed. Ralph Maud (Berkeley, California: University of California Press, 2000): 361–62. [Brief editor’s note on Prynne and Olson, followed by brief letter from Charles Olson To Jeremy Prynne, 14 May 1966].

Ben Watson, ‘Towards a Critical Madness’, in Mad Pride: A Celebration of Mad Culture, eds. Ted Curtis, Robert Dellar, Esther Leslie and Ben Watson (London: Chipmunka Publishing, 2000): 105–23 [112, 117]. [With the attribution to J.H. Prynne, ‘L’Extase de M. Poher’ just silently understood, Watson exclaims ‘Rubbish Is Pertinent!’; also notes, ‘As the poet JH Prynne once observed, the archive is a harmful place, and you don’t go digging around in there with impunity. If you’ve forgotten something it’s for a reason.’].

Iain Sinclair, Landor’s Tower; Or, The Imaginary Conversations (London: Granta Books, 2001). [Prynne again features as the character ‘Simon Undark’].

Keith Tuma, ed., Anthology of Twentieth-Century British and Irish Poetry (New York: Oxford University Press, 2001). [Introduction (p. xxviii, n7) notes that Prynne was originally to be included in the anthology but had to be omitted because the author declined to be represented in the book].

Jeremy Noel-Tod, ‘A Bird that Isn’t There’. London Review of Books (8 February 2001): 33.

Peter Finch, ‘The Mornings of J H Prynne #’s 1–3’ [visual poems]. Undated, online at http://www.peterfinch.co.uk/newvis~1.htm.

UKPOETRY listserv, previously online at http://listserv.muohio.edu/archives/UKPOETRY.html (April 2001 – May 2014) [An archive of the listserv is currently being built at King Library, Miami University, to be made public in June 2025. Among the tens of thousands of posts over the course of thirteen years, there were approximately 1300 items discussing Prynne].

Out To Lunch [Ben Watson], ‘Why Zappology? Performance VERSUS Art’ [subtitle: ‘Contingency & Improvisation as Plops in the Platonic Supreme, or, Why Angel Delight Won’t Suit Evil Dick: a Paper delivered by Out To Lunch to the Musique et Poésie Conference at Liège University: 3 April 2001’]. Online at http://www.militantesthetix.co.uk/zappo/WHY.html [with brief but direct discussion of Prynne].

Alison Croggon, ‘Toward a Naive Reading: Collected Poems by J.H. Prynne’. Slope, 10 (May–June 2001): online at http://www.slope.org/archive/ten/croggon.html [approx. pp. 4].

James Fenton, ‘Lyric’. Arêté, 5 (Spring/Summer 2001): 99. [This runs in full: ‘Jeremy Prynne | Jeremy Prynne | Isn’t your oeuvre rather thynne? | Don’t hit me with your rolling pynne | Jeremy | Jeremy | Jeremy Prynne’].

Adrian Clarke, letter in response to J.H. Prynne’s ‘Letter to Steve McCaffery’. The Gig, 9 (September 2001): [unknown page numbers].

Out To Lunch [Ben Watson], ‘Garbage: A Discussion of Value’ [address to the Birkbeck Centre for Contemporary Poetics Research on 1 November 2000]. Pores: A Journal of Poetics Research, 1 (October 2001), online at http://www.pores.bbk.ac.uk/1/index.html [approx. pp. 16].

Ben Watson, ‘Madness & Art’ [discussion of, int. al., J.H. Prynne, Unanswering Rational Shore]. [‘This paper on MADNESS was delivered by Ben Watson to Brian Catling’s Ruskin College students in Oxford at 4.30pm on Tuesday 30 October 2001, part of his “Art & Madness Circus”.’] Online at http://www.militantesthetix.co.uk/opticsyn/mad.htm [approx. pp. 25].

E.A. Markham, ‘Prynne is not Thynne’. The North, 29 ([November 2001]): 32–35. [The title actually is a collective one for this piece and the following one by Andy Sanderson; it derives from the James Fenton poem quoted in Markham’s piece].

Andy Sanderson, review of J.H. Prynne, Poems [1999]. The North, 29 ([November 2001]): 35–36. [Depending on how you look at it this is either untitled, or titled, like the E.A. Markham piece that precedes it, ‘Prynne is not Thynne’].

Gareth Twose and C.B. McCully, ‘Adverbial function in English verse: the case of thus’. Language and Literature, Vol. 10 No. 4 (November 2001): 291–306 [299, 306]. [An analysis on the use and frequency of the word ‘thus’ in English poetry, including analysis of a 1000-word random sample from J.H. Prynne’s Poems [1999]].

Tom Clark, Edward Dorn: A World of Difference (Berkeley, California: North Atlantic Books, 2002): 60, 427.

Douglas Oliver, ‘Money in Sunshine’, from the sequence China Blue (c. 1998). Published in A Meeting for Douglas Oliver and 27 Uncollected Poems (Cambridge: infernal methods, Street Editions and Poetical Histories, 2002): 75. Reprinted in Douglas Oliver, Arrondissements (Great Wilbraham, Cambridge/Applecross, Western Australia: Salt, 2003): 42. [The poem is addressed to ‘Jeremy’ and is dedicated ‘(for J.H. Prynne)’].

Michel Deguy, editorial introduction [in French] to five selections from Oripeau clinquaille, the 1977 French translation of Brass by B. Dubourg and J. H. Prynne. Po&sie, 98 (2002; Paris, Éditions Belin): 148.

John Wilkinson, ‘Frostwork and the Mud Vision’ [review of Anthology of Twentieth-Century British and Irish Poetry, ed. Keith Tuma (New York: Oxford University Press, 2001), The Bloodaxe Book of 20th-Century Poetry, ed. Edna Longley (Tarset, Northumberland: Bloodaxe Books, 2000), and The Penguin Book of Poetry from Britain and Ireland since 1945, eds. Simon Armitage and Robert Crawford (London: Penguin, 1998)]. Cambridge Quarterly, 31 (2002): 93–105 [101, 104]. Reprinted in John Wilkinson, The Lyric Touch; Essays on the Poetry of Excess (Cambridge: Salt, 2007).

Barbara Milech, ‘Remembering’. Overland, 169 (2002): 133–35 [134]. [A contribution in the ‘miscellany / DIALOGUE’ section of the journal; recounts that ‘Three Cambridge-connected, highly published poets recently visited Perth in the second part of the year – Jeremy Prynne, Rod Mengham, and John Kinsella. Prynne gave readings in Perth and Bunbury from his new Collected Poems (FACP/Bloodaxe Books), and presented a seminar on the Gunslinger cycle of poems by the US poetic prodigy, the late Ed Dorn, which included tapes of Dorn reading from Gunslinger.’].

Andrew Duncan, ‘Such that commonly each: A Various Art and the Cambridge Leisure Centre’. Jacket, 20 (December 2002), online at http://jacketmagazine.com/20/dunc-camb.html [approx. pp. 12].

John Kinsella, ‘Cambridge Notes (1996)’. Jacket, 20 (December 2002), online at http://jacketmagazine.com/20/kins-essay.html [approx. pp. 7].

Tom Clark, ‘Letters home from Cambridge (1963–65)’. Jacket, 20 (December 2002), online at http://jacketmagazine.com/20/clark-letters.html [approx. pp. 16].

Nate Dorward and Peter Robinson, ‘The Life of a Little Magazine: Perfect Bound 1976–1979’. Jacket, 20 (December 2002), online at http://jacketmagazine.com/20/pbi.html [approx. pp. 20].

Tony Lopez, ‘About Cambridge’. Jacket, 20 (December 2002), online at http://jacketmagazine.com/20/lopez-about.html. [‘[…] I was that boy who fell to earth, drunk, | punting a stolen boat into the small hours […] before Jeremy Prynne became a BLOODAXE poet […]’].

Jeremy Green, review of John Wilkinson, Effigies Against the Light (Cambridge: Salt Publishing, 2001). Chicago Review, Vol. 48 No. 4 (Winter 2002/2003): 132–35 [132–33]. [‘… Wilkinson’s poetry resembles that of the great contemporary English poet J.H. Prynne in its ethical rigor, late modernist acuity, and variousness of formal attack.’].

Richard Humphreys, ‘A Bash in the Tunnel’, in Ian Friend, Joy at Death Itself (no publishing information; likely produced in Woolloongabba, for ArtBunker, 2003): [n.p.]. [This pamphlet was printed for an exhibition of Ian Friend’s artworks at Andrew Baker Art Dealer, Brisbane (26 February – 15 March 2003), at Akky Van Ogtrop Fine Art, Sydney, Sydney Works on Paper Fair (31 July – 3 August 2003), at Stephen McLaughlan Gallery, Melbourne (10–27 September 2003), and at Helen Maxwell Gallery, Canberra (24 October – 22 November 2003). Humphrey’s short essay discusses inspirations Ian Friend finds in Prynne’s poetry, interpretations of The Oval Window in relation to Friend’s artworks, and correspondence between Prynne and Friend].

Keith Tuma, ‘Slobbering Distance: American, British, and Irish Exploratory Poetries in a Global Era’, in Assembling Alternatives: Essays in Transnational Reading, ed. Romana Huk (Middletown, Connecticut: Wesleyan University Press, 2003): 143–55.

Ben Watson [Out To Lunch], Shitkicks and Doughballs (London: Spare Change Books, 2003). [Prynne appears as ‘J.H. Prim’]. Online at http://www.militantesthetix.co.uk/skanddb/SKandDBfr.htm [novel length].

Ben Watson [Out To Lunch] / Esther Leslie, ‘A Statement of Militant Esthetix: A Talk given at The Aquarium Gallery, 29 August 2003’. Online at http://www.militantesthetix.co.uk/situationist/aquasit.htm [approx. pp. 15; thoughts on ‘Rubbish is pertinent…’ [from J.H. Prynne, ‘L’Extase de M. Poher’] and Asger Jorn].

Esther Leslie, ‘Pearls That Were’ [undated; on Walter Benjamin]. Online at http://www.militantesthetix.co.uk/waltbenj/Pearls.html [approx. pp. 7].

Maurice Chittenden, ‘Oxbridge Split by the Baffling Bard’. The Sunday Times, [Issue 9365] (22 February 2004): 9. Online at http://store3.thetimes.co.uk/ [requires paid subscription to read in full]. [Includes a brief quote from Prynne, and a photograph without the author’s permission].

John Carey, ‘Books’ [review of Randall Stevenson, The Oxford English Literary History, Vol. 12: 1960–2000: The Last of England?]. The Sunday Times, [Issue 9365] (22 February 2004): S9 pp. 41–42 [brief mention of Prynne’s inclusion in Stevenson’s volume].

John Mullan, ‘Prynne’s progress’. The Guardian (24 February 2004). Online at http://www.theguardian.com/books/2004/feb/24/poetry.news [approx. pp. 1].

Randall Stevenson, ‘A matter of Prynnciple’. The Guardian (28 February 2004): [unknown page numbers].

Jeremy Noel-Tod, ‘Much ado about poets’. The Daily Telegraph (13 March 2004): Arts and Entertainment p. 9. Online at http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/books/3614159/Much-ado-about-poets.html [approx. pp. 2]. [review of Randall Stevenson, The Oxford English Literary History, Vol. 12: 1960–2000: The Last of England?, and the media hoopla over Prynne’s inclusion in it].

David Herd and Robert Potts, ‘Editorial: Electric Nougat’. Poetry Review, Vol. 94 No. 1 (Spring 2004): [118–19]. Online at http://www.poetrymagazines.org.uk/magazine/record.asp?id=13619 [approx. pp. 2] [on the media hoopla over Prynne’s inclusion in the British poetic canon].

Keith Tuma and Nate Dorward, ‘Modernism and anti-Modernism in British Poetry’, in The Cambridge History of Twentieth-Century English Literature, eds. Laura Marcus and Peter Nicholls (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2004): 510–27.

Sam Ladkin, ‘“as they wander estranged”: Ed Dorn’s Gunslinger’. Edinburgh Review, 114 (2004: “The Darkness Surrounds Us”: American Poetry; eds. Sam Ladkin and Robin Purves): 59–95.

David Shepard, ‘NEW! Review of J.H. Prynne’ [review of J.H. Prynne, Furtherance]. Verse, (20 October 2004). Online at http://versemag.blogspot.com/2004/10/new-review-of-jh-prynne.html [approx. pp. 2].

John Tranter, ‘Why is modern poetry so difficult?’. The Weekend Australian, ‘Forum’ section (November 2004): 13–14. Online at http://johntranter.com/prose/2004-mp.shtml [approx. pp. 3].

Dylan Harris, review of Acrylic Tips (c. 2004/5). Online at http://dylanharris.org/prose/poetry/at.shtml [approx. pp. 2].

Paul March-Russell, ‘J.H. Prynne’, in The Literary Encyclopedia (21 January 2005), online at http://www.litencyc.com/php/speople.php?rec=true&UID=5881 [requires paid subscription to read in full].

Neil Astley, ‘The StAnza lecture, 2005’. StAnza, online at http://www.stanzapoetry.org/stanza06_archive/lecture.htm [approx. pp. 30; discussion of Prynne and modernism in relation to reaching a ‘broader readership’ in section 15, ‘Serious Trouble’, approx. pp. 15–16].

Esther Leslie/Ben Watson, ‘Introduction’, and Ben Watson qua Out To Lunch, ‘Poodles: a Zappological Reading of Ulysses’, in Academy Zappa: Proceedings of the First International Conference of Esemplastic Zappology (ICE-Z), eds. Esther Leslie and Ben Watson (London: SAF Publishing Ltd., 2005): 13–42 [39] and 187–210 [208], respectively. [The latter essay, though credited to the nonpareil Esemplasticist Gamma, was written by Ben Watson [a.k.a. Out To Lunch] in place of Gamma’s reading – at the First International Conference of Esemplastic Zappology (ICE-Z) on 16 January 2004 at Theatro Technis, London – of John Whiteside Parsons, ‘General Field Theory’, from Freedom is a Two-Edged Sword and Other Essays, eds. Cameron and Hymenaeus Beta (New York and Las Vegas: Ordo Templi Orientis in association with Falcon Press, 1989): 85–88 [written c. 1950]. p. 39 of Academy Zappa contains an illustrated ‘Starmap with Cake’, in which one of the stars is named ‘Prynne’; p. 208n4 lists Poodle Play (a.k.a. Ben Watson a.k.a. Out To Lunch)’s ‘terrifying dream team’ jury, consisting of J.H. Prynne and eleven others].

Sean Bonney, ‘Trout Mask Replica: A Dagger in the Head of Mojo Man,’ in Academy Zappa: Proceedings of the First International Conference of Esemplastic Zappology (ICE-Z), eds. Esther Leslie and Ben Watson (London: SAF Publishing Ltd., 2005): 109–18 [110]. Online at http://www.militantesthetix.co.uk/ice-z/sean.htm. [Bonney begins with a discussion of his first hearing of Captain Beefheart & the Magic Band’s album Trout Mask Replica (Straight Records [Reprise] double LP, 1969) in a squat in the Forest Fields area of Nottingham around 1990. After Bonney asked to hear the album, the person who owned it was begrudgingly obliging, then ‘eventually cut it off halfway through “Moonlight on Vermont” and gave it to me as a present. But not kindly, he was angered, and thought that I was just pretending to like it to be “cool”. I’ve heard the same argument since, with reference to most of my favourite things. Nobody can like Finnegans Wake, or Sun Ra, or the recent poetry of J.H. Prynne, and those who say they do are elitist scum trying to buy a bit of mystique through their choice of notoriously “difficult” cultural products. Poets and revolutionaries have a duty to mercilessly mock persons with such opinions as saddoes who like to project their own cultural and political misery on everyone else.’ This essay, and almost all of the essays in the collection, was originally delivered as a talk at the First International Conference of Esemplastic Zappology (ICE-Z) on 16 January 2004 at Theatro Technis, London].

Esther Leslie, Synthetic Worlds: Nature, Art and the Chemical Industry (London: Reaktion, 2005): 226–33, 251, and quotes J.H. Prynne, ‘Cool as a Mountain Stream’, in full on 226–27.

[Jow Lindsay], ‘Editorial – FY05 Budgeted Revenues’. He’s Asked For Size Ten Arial On This One & It Goes Over The Edge A Bit But If It’s Size Ten Arial He Wants It’s Size Ten Arial He’s Getting, 1 (2005): 2. [As part of the bar graph ‘Bad Press – FY05 Projected Revenues’: ‘At a Loss – £0.1m budgeted revenue improvement due to increased investment in covermount and costs incurred incentivising the JH Prynne criticism sector by mooting a bottle of Jim Beam bourbon to the first correct solution to Unanswering Rational Shore, a novelty John Wilkinson’s Effigies Against the Light to the incensed runner-up’].

jUStin!katKO [a.k.a. Justin Katko], ‘Utility Belts!’. Verfassungspatriotisthmus, 1 (July 2005; eds. Jow Lindsay, Marianne Morris and Jonathan Stevenson): 42. [Line 4: ‘plural crystals of prynne facets night of black!rainbows’].

[Jow Lindsay, Marianne Morris and possibly Jonathan Stevenson], ‘Miscellany’. Verfassungspatriotisthmus, 1 (July 2005; eds. Jow Lindsay, Marianne Morris and Jonathan Stevenson): 48–70. [Various references int. al.: ‘The bottle of bourbon goes to Malcolm Phillips for explaining that JHP meant “rock on” (see Bad Press Serials Version 1, page 2)’ [p. 48, attributed to Jow Lindsay]; ‘09 Mar 05 ~ Matt ffytche, “Fire and Loathing & Lost Vagueness”: Prynne’s “Of Sanguine Fire” & the predicaments of poetic cosmology, The Council Room, Birkbeck College’ [p. 57, unattributed listing]; handwritten notes on Stephen Rodefer’s 27 April 2005 talk at the Council Room, Birkbeck College, London, ‘Talk Theory: Let’s Have Another Blast for Wyndham!’ [notes reproduced on p. 59, attributed to Marianne Morris]; and, from a Resonance 104.4fm listing for the 15 June 2005 show of Late Lunch with Out To Lunch, ‘The Acrid Politics of Contemporary Poetry w/ guest Keston Sutherland’ – ‘[…] In recent years [Sutherland has] served as “incomprehensible Cambridge poet” JH Prynne’s amanuensis, but though Sutherland considers himself a “Prynnian” he hasn’t adopted the Master’s quietistic politics, attending – & encouraging others to attend – all the recent anti-war obilisations.’ [sic; unattributed listing on p. 65, of a text clearly written by Ben Watson, a.k.a. Out To Lunch].

Andrew Duncan, Centre and Periphery in Modern British Poetry (Liverpool: Liverpool University Press, 2005).

Robert Bond, Iain Sinclair (Cambridge: Salt, 2005).

Jonathan Skinner, Ecopoetics: Outsider Poetries of the Twentieth Century (Unpublished dissertation, State University of New York at Buffalo, 2005); Chapter 2, which cites Prynne’s letter to Charles Olson, 9 May 1966, online at http://epc.buffalo.edu/authors/olson/blog/SkinnerOlson.pdf [approx. pp. 14].

Andrew Neilson, review of, int. al., J.H. Prynne, Poems [2005]. magma, 33 (Winter 2005): 59–63. Online at http://www.poetrymagazines.org.uk/magazine/record.asp?id=18860 [approx. pp. 5].

Martin Stannard, ‘Kind of Inadequate and a Little Guilty’ [review of J.H. Prynne, Poems [2005]]. Stride Magazine (October 2005), online at http://www.stridemagazine.co.uk/2005/Oct%202005/stannard.prynne.htm [approx. pp. 5].

John Mullan, ‘What are our poets writing about?’. The Guardian, (5 October 2005): [unknown page numbers]. Online at https://www.theguardian.com/books/2005/oct/05/poetry.forwardprizeforpoetry2005 [approx. pp. 7]. [Brief discussion of Prynne and ‘the Prynnites’ at approx. p. 5].

Jeremy Noel-Tod, ‘Poets exist to write the unsayable’ [letter to the editor of The Guardian]. The Guardian, (7 October 2005): [unknown page numbers]. Online at https://www.theguardian.com/books/2005/oct/08/comment.letters [approx. pp. 1]. [Rebuts John Mullan’s article ‘What are our poets writing about?’ published 5 October 2005].

Robert Potts, ‘Sulks, mosaics and misprints’. The Guardian, (16 December 2005): [unknown page numbers]. Online at http://www.theguardian.com/books/2005/dec/17/bestbooksoftheyear.bestbooks [includes J.H. Prynne, Poems [2005] among the year’s best books of poetry].

‘Prynne, J(eremy) H(alvard)’, in The Cambridge Guide to Literature in English, 3rd ed., ed. Dominic Head (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2006): 902.

Peter Larkin, Leaves of Field (Exeter: Shearsman Books, 2006): [8]. [The second of four epigraphs to the sequence ‘Leaves of Field’ [pp. [7]–58, written 2004] is by J H Prynne: ‘Don’t make sores if | you can’t pay to dress their origin’. The quote is from the [fifth] page of Biting the Air [n.p.], (i.e., J.H. Prynne, Poems [2015]: 557)].

Ian Brinton, ‘Black Mountain in England (4)’. PN Review, Vol. 32 No. 5 [169] (May–June 2006): 50–53. [On Andrew Crozier. Includes discussion of Prynne’s introduction to Andrew Crozier’s Loved Litter of Time Spent (Buffalo, New York: Sumbooks, 1967). Prynne’s introduction is reprinted in Andrew Crozier, An Andrew Crozier Reader, ed. Ian Brinton (Manchester: Carcanet Press, 2012): 19].

Peter Barry, Poetry Wars: British Poetry of the 1970s and the Battle of Earls Court (Cambridge: Salt, 2006).

Trevor Dann, Darker Than the Deepest Sea: The Search for Nick Drake (Cambridge, Massachusetts: Da Capo Press, 2006): 15, 51. [Mentions that ‘other critics have picked up on the more radical side of Nick [Drake]’s work and the influence of Jeremy Prynne and Sylvia Plath.’ Also, ‘Peter Rice has a clear memory of Nick [Drake] lounging against the wall at the Gate of Humility on Trinity Street, the main entrance to Caius, and chatting animatedly with Jeremy Prynne, the English academic and highly regarded modern poet, now Professor JH Prynne.’ See also Rob Young’s still breezier take on Drake’s time at Cambridge University between 1967 and 1969 in Electric Eden: Unearthing Britain’s Visionary Music (London: Faber & Faber, 2011): 299].

Ian Friend, ‘For JHP #7’, 1999–2000 [artwork inspired by Prynne]. Ian Friend (Woolloongabba: ArtBunker, 2006): [n.p.]. [This pamphlet, featuring seven works by Ian Friend and Angela Gardner’s ‘Three poems for Ian Friend’, was printed for an exhibition of Ian Friend’s artworks at Stella Downer Fine Art, Sydney (22 August – 16 September 2006) and at Stephen McLaughlan Gallery, Melbourne (13 – 30 September 2006)].

Andrew Crozier interviewed by Andrew Duncan, ‘How High the Zero’, in Don’t Start Me Talking: Interviews with Contemporary Poets, eds. Tim Allen and Andrew Duncan (Cambridge: Salt, 2006): 111–30. [Discusses Crozier’s method of composition of High Zero in relation to J.H. Prynne, High Pink on Chrome, and John James, Striking the Pavilion of Zero].

Out To Lunch [Ben Watson] interviewed by Andrew Duncan, ‘Pink Pong Punx Go Dingo’, in Don’t Start Me Talking: Interviews with Contemporary Poets, eds. Tim Allen and Andrew Duncan (Cambridge: Salt, 2006): 314–35.

Melissa Flores-Bórquez, ‘J.H. Prynne’s Unanswering Rational Shore’. Intercapillary Space, (February 2007), online at http://intercapillaryspace.blogspot.com/2007/02/petrol-in-search-of-flame-j-h-prynnes.html [approx. pp. 3].

Ian Brinton, ‘Black Mountain in England (6)’. PN Review, Vol. 33 No. 4 [174] (March–April 2007): 65–68. [Includes brief discussion of John Temple’s meetings with Prynne in Cambridge in the early 1960s, and, regarding Charles Olson and his letters on the Pleistocene, quotes from J.H. Prynne, ‘The Glacial Question, Unsolved’].

Sam Ladkin and Robin Purves, ‘An Introduction’. Chicago Review, Vol. 53 No. 1 (Spring 2007: British Poetry Issue): 6–13.

John Wilkinson, ‘Off the Grid: Lyric and Politics in Andrea Brady’s Embrace’. Chicago Review, Vol. 53 No. 1 (Spring 2007: British Poetry Issue): 95–115.

Chris Goode and Sam Ladkin, ‘Some Correspondence’. Chicago Review, Vol. 53 No. 1 (Spring 2007: British Poetry Issue): 126–138 [130–31].

Simon Jarvis, ‘The Poetry of Keston Sutherland’. Chicago Review, Vol. 53 No. 1 (Spring 2007: British Poetry Issue): 139–45.

Edward Dorn, Ed Dorn Live: Lectures, Interviews, and Outtakes, ed. Joseph Richey (Ann Arbor: University of Michigan, 2007): 43–44, 109, 126, 153, 161–63, 167 [anecdotes and insights].

Peter Riley, The Day’s Final Balance: Uncollected Writings 1965–2006 (Exeter: Shearsman Books, 2007): 85 [from the sequence ‘Floating Verses: the collection of very small poems 1963–2003’: ‘I didn’t know Christopher Whelan was dead | (a plummy voice on the phone, almost trembling, | ordering books by Reznikoff and Prynne) | I never heard his music.’].

Ulf Stolterfoht, holzrauch über heslach (Basel/Weil am Rhein: Urs Engeler Editor, 2007): 9–21. [Long poem in German, in nine parts. Each of the nine parts loosely translates or is directly inspired by one or more sources. The introductory poem [on p. 9] and part I [pp. 11–21] adapt J.H. Prynne, News of Warring Clans].

Karla Kelsey, [poems from Iteration Nets]. Forklift, Ohio, 17 (Summer 2007): [unknown page numbers], samples Prynne, among others.

William Watkin, ‘JH Prynne, The Oval Window’ (May 2007). Online at http://williamwatkin.blogspot.com/2007/05/jh-prynne-oval-window.html [approx. pp. 2].

Tim Tucker, ‘Marvell and Prynne – The Delights and Dangers of Ambiguity’. The Culture Club (May 2007), online at http://www.thecultureclub.net/2007/05/01/marvell-and-prynne-the-delights-and-dangers-of-ambiguity/ [approx. pp. 5].

Xtin, review of J.H. Prynne, Marzipan. [with Massepain, French translation of Marzipan, by B. Dubourg and J. H. Prynne] (Cambridge: Poetical Histories, 2; printed and distributed by Peter Riley (Books), 1986). Intercapillary Space, (June 2007), online at http://intercapillaryspace.blogspot.com/2007/06/poetical-histories-2.html [approx. pp. 2].

Lacy Rumsey, ‘Formal innovation in non-mainstream British poetry since 1985: notes towards analysis’. Études Anglaises, Vol. 60 No. 3 (July–September 2007): 330–45.

Robert Potts, ‘Beneath the surface of Wordsworth’ [review of J.H. Prynne, Field Notes: ‘The Solitary Reaper’ and Others]. The Guardian, (15 October 2007), online at http://www.theguardian.com/books/booksblog/2007/oct/15/howtoreadapoem [approx. pp. 2].

Don Paterson, ‘The Lyric Principle’. Online at http://www.donpaterson.com/files/arspoetica/The%20Lyric%20Principle.pdf [approx pp. 64; Prynne’s poetry is discussed on approx. p. 28 and p. 31, e.g., ‘Recently I made a phonetic analysis of a few of Jeremy Prynne’s poems, and the results were rather interesting: Prynne’s default music runs directly counter to all the norms of the English lyric tradition. In every aspect we find him doing what we might caricature as “the opposite of Heaney” […] the verse appeared to work on a deliberately anti-lyric principle. […] as we know, Prynne’s poetry is notoriously discontinuous […]’, etc.]. The online text is a slightly modified version of ‘The Lyric Principle, Part 1: The Sense of Sound’, originally published in Poetry Review, Vol. 97 No. 2 (Summer 2007): 56–72; and ‘The Lyric Principle, Part 2: The Sound of Sense’, originally published in Poetry Review, Vol. 97 No. 3 (Autumn 2007): 54–70 [See also characteristic one-line dismissals of Prynne in Paterson’s ‘The Dark Art of Poetry’, et. al., on the same site].

Keston Sutherland, ‘Poetics’ [review of books published in 2005]. The Year’s Work in Critical and Cultural Theory, Vol.15 (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2007): 111–27 [123].

Peter Riley, ‘Tall Tales of the Newcastle Poetry Revolution’ [undated, unpublished essay], online at http://www.aprileye.co.uk/talltales.html [approx. pp. 6].

Drew Milne, ‘Modernist Poetry in the British Isles’, in The Cambridge Companion to Modernist Poetry, eds. Alex Davis and Lee M. Jenkins (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2007): 147–62.

Seamus Perry, ‘The guise of song’ [review of J.H. Prynne, Field Notes: ‘The Solitary Reaper’ and Others]. TLS [Times Literary Supplement], (25 January 2008): 12.

Craig Raine, ‘All jokes aside’. The Guardian, (10 March 2008): Great poets of the 20th century section, 7. [The source of Raine’s oft-quoted squib, regarding T.S. Eliot and his work’s scholarly exegesis: ‘This view of modernism has been so influential it has spawned a postmodern poetic school led by JH Prynne whose purpose is to be difficult – emulatively difficult. (Not difficult to be difficult, actually.)’].

Jane Holland, ‘Drinking Beowulf’s Blood: The Influence of Old English on Contemporary Poetry’. Horizon Review, 2 (2008).

Ian Friend, various artworks inspired by J.H. Prynne, featured in Friend’s collection On Paper (Brisbane: Andrew Baker, 2008): 28-29 [‘For JHP #8’ [detail]], 30 [‘For JHP #8’, 1998–2001], 36 [‘Biting the air #8’, 2004], 37 [‘Biting the air #8’ [detail]], 38 [‘Biting the air #9’ [detail]], 39 [‘Biting the air #9’, 2004], 44 [‘Biting the air #12’, 2006], 45–47 [‘Biting the air #12’ [details]]. [‘Biting the air #9’ was also featured on a standalone promotional card for ArtBunker [undated, though produced sometime between 2004–2008]].

Kyle Waugh, News from Now/Here: Ed Dorn, Lawrence, Kansas, & the Poetics of Migration – 1965–1970 (Unpublished Masters Dissertation, University of Kansas, 2008). Online at http://kuscholarworks.ku.edu/bitstream/handle/1808/6627/umi-ku-2695_1.pdf;jsessionid=70DBA2EBC57BF6787F9F62862A0DC4A1?sequence=1. [Contains occasional discussion of Prynne’s correspondence and friendship with Dorn].

Andrew Duncan, Origins of the Underground: British poetry between apocryphon and incident light, 1933–79 (Cambridge: Salt, 2008).

Peter Middleton, ‘Junk DNA in Recent American Poetry’, in Another Language: Poetic Experiments in Britain and North America, eds. Kornelia Freitage and Katharina Vester (Berlin: Lit Verlag, 2008): 27–42. [Discusses ‘The Plant Time Manifold Transcripts’].

David Grundy, ‘Editorial’. Eartrip, 2 (September 2008): 1–5 [2]. Online at https://ia700406.us.archive.org/6/items/eartrip_magazine/eartrip_2-complete.pdf. [Grundy notes that jazz/poetry ‘collaborations are more often than not ignored, much in the same way that adventurous British poetry of the 60s and beyond, by the likes of [Peter] Riley, J.H. Prynne and Tom Raworth, was confined to small presses and a limited readership of devoted admirers (which enabled its opponents to criticize it as elitist, though they were actually the ones suppressing it).’].

Charlotte Higgins, ‘Jeremy Prynne for poet laureate!’. The Guardian, (25 November 2008), online at http://www.theguardian.com/culture/charlottehigginsblog/2008/nov/25/poetry-monarchy [approx. pp. 1].

Seamus Heaney, Stepping Stones (New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2008). [Heaney evidently mentions Prynne in conversation; see http://georgiasam.blogspot.com/search?q=prynne]. Likewise, Seamus Heaney, ‘Beyond the Fiddle’, Poetry, (December 2008), [unknown page numbers] [Answer to question 15].

Elliott Ross, ‘Protesters forced out despite dons’ support’. Varsity, 688 (30 January 2009): 1. Online at http://archive.varsity.co.uk/688.pdf [pp. 1]. [Preserves Prynne’s message of support to student demonstrators at Cambridge, stressing the importance of British engagement with the Israeli–Palestinian conflict].

Neil Pattison, ‘“The mirrors are tired of our faces”: Changing Subject in the Poetry of Veronica Forrest-Thomson’. Kenyon Review Online [c. 2009], online at http://www.kenyonreview.org/kr-online-issue/index-2/selections/veronica-forrest-thomson-for-readers/ [approx. pp. 16, Prynne discussed 9ff.].

Aidan Semmens, ‘Argument: Culminating in a Line from JH Prynne’. Great Works, (2009), online at http://www.greatworks.org.uk/poems/as2.html.

David Grundy, review of Henry Grimes, Signs Along the Road: Poems (Cologne, Germany: buddy’s knife jazzedition, 2007). Eartrip, 3 (March 2009): [n.p.] [approx. 76–79] [79]. Online at https://ia700406.us.archive.org/6/items/eartrip_magazine/Eartrip-Issue3.pdf. [According to Grundy, Henry Grimes’s ‘patterns tend, perhaps, to emerge more from a way of thinking and speaking unique to Grimes (just as reading J.H. Prynne’s prose helps one understand some of the characteristic twists of phrasing that contribute so much to the strangeness of his poems).’].

‘Caius goes to China’, section ‘Poetry to China’. Once a Caian…, 9 (Spring 2009): 18–19. [Includes a short article about Prynne’s work and interests in China; a photograph of ‘A pictographic ritual script inscribed and given to Jeremy Prynne by a scholar-priest of the Naxi minority peoples, in North-western Yunan Province’; and a photograph of ‘A Buddhist text inscribed for and to Jeremy Prynne by Vice-President Hong-xin of Hunan Normal University in Changsha’]. Online at http://www.cai.cam.ac.uk/sites/www.cai.cam.ac.uk/files/downloads/once_a_caian._issue_9.pdf.

Josh Stanley, ‘An Open Note: “Shit!”3 “[W]e have got needs[!]”4’. Hot Gun!, 1 (Summer 2009): 3–10 [regarding J.H. Prynne, ‘Resistance and Difficulty’].

Damn the Caesars, Vol. 5 (2009; ed. Richard Owens): 4. [The issue’s epigraph is the first two sentences of the lower block of text on p. 19 of J.H. Prynne, High Pink on Chrome (i.e., the first two sentences of the lower block of text in J.H. Prynne, Poems [2015]: 256). The lineation is slightly altered].

Andrew Duncan, ‘Introduction’, in Joseph MacLeod, Cyclic Serial Zeniths from the Flux; Selected Poems, ed. Andrew Duncan (Hove: Waterloo Press, 2009): [unknown page numbers]. [Mentions Duncan’s interest in MacLeod beginning with a 1981 letter from J.H. Prynne recommending MacLeod’s poem The Ecliptic. The back cover of Cyclic Serial Zeniths from the Flux; Selected Poems also mentions Prynne’s interest in MacLeod’s work].

Ian Friend, ‘Star Damage at Home #2’, 2007–2008 [detail], in A Manner of Utterance: The Poetry of J.H. Prynne, ed. Ian Brinton (Exeter: Shearsman Books, 2009): front cover. [Artwork inspired by J.H. Prynne].

Ian Brinton, Contemporary Poetry: Poets and Poetry since 1990 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2009): 32, 39, 57, 108, 109, 111, and an excerpt, lines 1–16, from J.H. Prynne, ‘Refuse Collection’ on 100–01.

John Wilkinson, ‘The American Tract’ [in English], in Pearl River Meandering with Poetic Thought; Proceedings of the Second Pearl River International Poetry Conference, ed. Ou Hong (Guangzhou: Sun Yat-sen University Press, 2009): 9–16 [15–16]. [Originally a talk delivered at the Second Pearl River International Poetry Conference, Guangzhou, P.R. China, 14th–15th June 2008. ‘The poetry of J.H. Prynne was the first writing in English fully to understand and represent the density of the present condition. […] Beauty can still be made, J.H. Prynne’s poetry shows, but requires the reader to work through fantastic exactions. But what alternative is there? Beauty off the shelf just confirms stupidity, which unfortunately is the effect of most poetry and other art.’].

Peter Manson, Adjunct: An Undigest (London: Barque Press, July 2009): 14, 18, 24, 49, 50, 68, 79, 91. [‘JH Prynne does not resemble John Cleese.’ ‘Prynne lineation in poems not by Prynne.’ ‘Jeremy Beadle delivers free lunch to Jeremy Prynne.’ ‘Prynne is right.’ ‘Prynne is wrong.’ ‘Moleskin Prynne-puppet.’ ‘Prynne-phone.’ ‘Can’t help but wonder slightly about section 8 of Prynne’s For the Monogram.’ ‘Damn the ashen light in Prynne’s Melanin.’].

John Kinsella, ‘prefatory note to “manifesto for a school of environmental poetics and creativity”’. Angelaki: Journal of the Theoretical Humanities, Vol. 14 No. 2 (August 2009): 143–48.

Andrew Duncan, The Council of Heresy: A Primer of Poetry in a Balkanised Terrain (Exeter: Shearsman Books, 2009).

Daniel Barrow, ‘When Two Tribes Go to War: Dan Barrow on Essays and Experiments’ [review of, int. al.A Manner of Utterance: The Poetry of J.H. Prynne, ed. Ian Brinton]. Horizon Review, 3 (2009). [approx. pp. 10].

Jeffrey Side, ‘The Dissembling Poet: Seamus Heaney and the Avant-garde’. Jacket, 37 (2009), online at http://jacketmagazine.com/37/heaney-side.shtml [approx. pp. 11].

Rob Stanton, ‘“A shy soul fretting and all that”: Heaney, Prynne and Brands of Uncertainty’. Jacket, 37 (2009), online at http://jacketmagazine.com/37/heaney-prynne-by-stanton.shtml [approx. pp. 12].

Jeremy Noel-Tod, ‘A History of Difficulty: On Cambridge Poetry’. Cambridge Literary Review, Vol. 1 No. 1 (Michaelmas 2009): 97–102.

Peter Riley, ‘Afterword’ to his selection of Poems by Ray Crump. Cambridge Literary Review, Vol. 1 No. 1 (Michaelmas 2009): 136–40.

Elaine Feinstein, ‘Remembering Prospect’. Cambridge Literary Review, Vol. 1 No. 1 (Michaelmas 2009): 141–47.

‘CaiMemories: N.R. (Buzz) Burrell’. Once a Caian…, 10 (Michaelmas 2009): 26. [Photograph accompanying an announcement of N.R. Burrell’s posthumous Selected Works, from the book’s launch at Caius College on 20 September 2008]. Online at http://www.cai.cam.ac.uk/sites/www.cai.cam.ac.uk/files/downloads/once_a_caian.issue_10.pdf.

Ben Watson, ‘Noise as Permanent Revolution or, Why Culture Is a Sow Which Devours its Own Farrow’, in Noise & Capitalism, eds. Mattin and Anthony Iles (Donostia-San Sebastian (Gipuzkoa): Arteleku Audiolab, September 2009): 105–20 [115]. Online at http://www.tenstakonsthall.se/uploads/68-NoiseCapitalismMattinAnthonyIleseds.pdf. [‘[Modern art’s] most extreme and effective moments involve rubbishing all previous cultural standards, achievements, techniques and skills: Asger Jorn’s childish scribbles, Derek Bailey’s “can’t play” guitar, J.H. Prynne’s “incomprehensible” poetry.’ David Grundy critiques this argument in his review of Noise & Capitalism in Eartrip, 5 (March 2010): [n.p.] [approx. 116–30 [122–24]], online at https://ia700406.us.archive.org/6/items/eartrip_magazine/Eartrip5.pdf].

Keston Sutherland, Stress Position (London: Barque Press, 2009): [n.p.] [22, 33]. [The relevant quote on [p. 22] is ‘DONUT! Love this man!’ (cf. J.H. Prynne, ‘The Bee Target on his Shoulder’). [p. 33] mentions Prynne in a crossed-out footnote; an excerpt from Stress Position with this crossed-out footnote 6, renumbered as footnote 1, is published in Cambridge Literary Review, Vol. 1 No. 1 (Michaelmas 2009): 66–70 [68]]. Stress Position is reprinted in full in Keston Sutherland, Poetical Works 1999–2015 (London: Enitharmon Press, 2015): 231–70 [the former reference is on p. 251 (as ‘Donut! love this man.’); the latter reference has not been retained].

Richard Berengarten, ‘The Cambridge Poetry Festival: 35 years after’. Cambridge Literary Review, Vol. 1 No. 1 (Michaelmas 2009): 148–60 [153].

Gareth Farmer, ‘“The slightly hysterical style of University talk”: Veronica Forrest-Thomson and Cambridge’. Cambridge Literary Review, Vol. 1 No. 1 (Michaelmas 2009): 161–77 [scattered criticisms, comparisons, anecdotes].

Nicola Masciandaro, ‘Introduction’. Glossator: Practice and Theory of the Commentary, 1 (Fall 2009; eds. Ryan Dobran, Nicola Masciandaro and Karl Steel): i–ii [i]. Online at https://solutioperfecta.files.wordpress.com/2011/10/introduction-glossator-one-8×10.pdf. [Features as epigraphs an excerpt from each of the contributions to the issue, which includes Prynne’s essay ‘Tintern Abbey, Once Again’, on pp. 81–88 [83]. Prynne’s essay is online at https://solutioperfecta.files.wordpress.com/2011/10/prynne-tintern-abbey-once-again-8×10.pdf].

Michael Stone-Richards, ‘A Commentary on Theresa Hak Kyung Cha’s Dictée’. Glossator: Practice and Theory of the Commentary, 1 (Fall 2009; eds. Ryan Dobran, Nicola Masciandaro and Karl Steel): 145–210 [146, 186–87, 191]. Online at https://solutioperfecta.files.wordpress.com/2011/10/stone-richards-a-commentary-on-chas-dictee-8×10.pdf.

John Armstrong, Bebrowed’s Blog and Arduity website (October 2009 to the present), online at https://bebrowed.wordpress.com/tag/j-h-prynne/ and http://www.arduity.com/poets/prynne/index.html , respectively. [A large collection of notes, introductions and analyses of Prynne’s poetry and prose. As of September 2015 there are approx. pp. 30 of Prynne-related entries on the blog and eleven separate articles on the website].

English Poetry Studies Institute (EPSI) website, ‘Suzhou Briefings’ (posted 24 November 2009), online at http://fls8.sysu.edu.cn/fls/Poesy/infor.aspx?id=25285348469&type=4565437874&pub=5836542337 [approx. pp. 2]. [Mentions, in Chinese, a speech on 20 November 2009 at Suzhou University by the vice president of the teacher’s General Assembly entitled [according to Google Translate] ‘Prynne of Chinese poetry’. The banner at the head of the webpage, as with all the English Poetry Studies Institute (EPSI) webpages, features three photographs of Prynne in P.R. China].

Simon Jarvis, Wordsworth’s Philosophic Song (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press: 2009): 228n59, 234n38. [Discussing an excerpt from a letter by William and Dorothy Wordsworth sent to Mary and Sara Hutchinson, Jarvis relates ‘I was first brought to think about this passage by a lecture course given by J.H. Prynne in the Faculty of English, University of Cambridge, 1984.’ [p. 228]].

Chris Goode, ‘Boob News’. Thompson’s Bank of Communicable Desire, (20 January 2010), online at http://beescope.blogspot.com/ [approx. pp. 5; very considerate treatment of the ‘Nowhere Man’ question. Offers a possible explanation for Spring 2009 Google searches of ‘J.H. Prynne’ resulting in the Wikipedia page for the ‘Nowhere Man’ character from The Beatles’s 1968 animated film Yellow Submarine].

David Grundy, review of Noise & Capitalism, eds. Mattin and Anthony Iles (Donostia-San Sebastian (Gipuzkoa): Arteleku Audiolab, September 2009). Eartrip, 5 (March 2010): [n.p.] [approx. 116–30 [122–24]], online at https://ia700406.us.archive.org/6/items/eartrip_magazine/Eartrip5.pdf. [Includes a critique of Ben Watson’s argument about ‘J.H. Prynne’s “incomprehensible” poetry’ in Watson’s essay ‘Noise as Permanent Revolution or, Why Culture Is a Sow Which Devours its Own Farrow’ (Noise & Capitalism: 105–20 [115]). Noise & Capitalism is online, in full, at http://www.tenstakonsthall.se/uploads/68-NoiseCapitalismMattinAnthonyIleseds.pdf].

John Wilkinson, ‘Contemporary Lyric and Epic Constraints: A Reading of Rob Halpern’s Weak Link’. Chicago Review, Vol. 55 No. 2 (Spring 2010): 83–96.

John Wilkinson, ‘The loveliness of “Linen”’. Critical Quarterly, Vol. 52 No. 1 (April 2010): 108–18 [118]. [‘The Enigmatic poem is rarely achieved and seems to require either the poet’s isolation, as with Emily Dickinson or early William Blake, or else an historical shift whose immense force as it were crystallises, for instance in early poems by William Wordsworth and S. T. Coleridge, or in late poems by Thomas Hardy and W. B. Yeats. A more recent example would be J. H. Prynne’s “Es lebe der König” and indeed much of Brass, the book containing that poem. Much as poems by Hardy and Yeats crystallised out of forces at play in the advent of modernism, Brass marks modernism’s change into something still unsatisfactorily named. Enigmatic poems tend to be scarce in a poet’s work; to seek after the enigmatic leads to portentousness or affected mysticism. But most poets badly want to produce the enigmatic poem, the object of fascination which will gather readers, and throughout its indefinite half-life will seem itself to produce the conjectures its readers come to entertain.’].

Chris Hardy, ‘Ray Crump: A Commentary and Memoir’. Cambridge Literary Review, Vol. 1 No. 2 (Lent 2010): 125–30 [130].

Justin Katko, ‘On “Song of the Wanking Iraqi”’. Cambridge Literary Review, Vol. 1 No. 2 (Lent 2010): 171–97 [195]. [Notes that Prynne’s review of Keston Sutherland’s Hot White Andy was commissioned by The Guardian, who then declined to publish it].

Andrea Brady, letter to the editor. Cambridge Literary Review, Vol. 1 No. 2 (Lent 2010): 244–49. [On a Cambridge School not predicated on Prynne’s example]. Followed by a response from Robert Archambeau, pp. 249–51.

John Latta, review of Steffen Brown, ‘Prynne in Boise’ (in A Thing Terrible to Publick Traytors, ed. Boyd Nielson (Boston, Massachusetts: Property Press, 2010): 21–26). Online at http://isola-di-rifiuti.blogspot.com/2010/06/dorn-prynne.html [approx. pp. 4].

Peter Barry, ‘Contemporary British Modernisms’, in Teaching Modernist Poetry, eds. Peter Middleton and Nicky Marsh (London: Palgrave, 2010): 94–115 [104].

Robert Sheppard, ‘Experiments in Practice and Speculation in Poetics’, in Teaching Modernist Poetry, eds. Peter Middleton and Nicky Marsh (London: Palgrave, 2010): 158–69 [163].

Michael H. Whitworth, Reading Modernist Poetry (Chichester, West Sussex: Wiley-Blackwell, 2010): 176, 221, 229, 233. [Quotes from N.H. Reeve and Richard Kerridge, Nearly Too Much: The Poetry of J.H. Prynne; and credits inspiration from J.H. Prynne, ‘Tips on Practical Criticism’, advice for university students previously online at www.cai.cam.ac.uk/students/study/english/tips/praccrit.pdf, and currently online at http://babylon.acad.cai.cam.ac.uk/students/study/english/list.php].

John James, ‘Xibeau D. Great’, in Mad Dogs & Bitches (Cambridge: Flag of Convenience, 2010): [n.p.]. References J.H. Prynne, ‘The Bee Target on His Shoulder’, attributed to ‘Jay L. Ray’].

Out To Lunch [Ben Watson], Smooch Tentet Resolve (London: Veer, 2010): [n.p.]. [poem sequence containing int. al. pun references to Prynne, i.e., Prynne’s signature ‘shew’ [29], ‘preen’ and ‘pringle’ [58], etc. Look hard enough, you’ll find them]. Also available in audio form, online at https://archive.org/details/smoochtentetresolve, with excerpts read by Out To Lunch as well as Canadian radio host Ken Fox on ten radio show episodes; see https://archive.org/search.php?query=smooch%20tentet.

Ben Watson, ‘No More Poodles II: Bogue versus Vogue’. Mute, (September 2010), online at http://www.metamute.org/editorial/mute-music/no-more-poodles-ii-bogue-versus-vogue [approx. pp. 6; review of, int. al., J.H. Prynne, Sub  Songs].

Kent Johnson, A Question Mark Above the Sun: Documents on the Mystery Surrounding a Famous Poem “by” Frank O’Hara (Scarborough, Maine: Punch Press, 2010): 57–66 [‘The Garden of Pembroke’ chapter], with numerous mentions of Prynne elsewhere in relation to this chapter. Reprinted, in an expanded second edition (Buffalo, New York: Starcherone Books, 2012): 71–84 [‘The Garden of Pembroke’ chapter]. ‘The Garden of Pembroke’ chapter is reprinted, with alterations, from Chicago Review, Vol. 53 No. 2/3 (Fall 2007): 218–25.

Ian Brinton, David Caddy, Michael Grant, et al., Tears in the Fence website, Notes and Blog sections (from December 2011 to the present, with frequent updates). Online at http://tearsinthefence.com/, and, on specifically Prynne, at http://tearsinthefence.com/?s=prynne. [Features extensive discussions, quotations, anecdotes and mentions of Prynne, perhaps pp. 100 as of September 2015. A frequent source of bibliographical updates].

Elaine Feinstein, ‘Portugal Place, Cambridge, 1959’. Poetry Review, Vol. 100 No. 3 (Autumn 2010): 78–85 [83].

Simon Jarvis, ‘The Melodics of Long Poems’. Textual Practice, Vol. 24 No. 4 (2010): 607–21 [610–11]. [Discusses, int. al., Prynne’s transcribed talk ‘The Elegiac World in Victorian Poetry’]. A version of this discussion also published in Simon Jarvis, ‘Why Rhyme Pleases’. Thinking Verse, 1 (2011): 17–43 [21–25]. Online at http://www.thinkingverse.com/issue01/Simon%20Jarvis,%20Why%20rhyme%20pleases.pdf [pp. 23]. [‘Why Rhyme Pleases’ was originally posted Summer 2010; the journal was subsequently revised, with additional articles and page ranges assigned, and given a 2011 publication date].

Ryan Dobran, ‘The Battle of Maldon’ (27 October 2010), online at https://scotograph.wordpress.com/ [on J.H. Prynne, ‘Song in Sight of the World’].

[Jeremy Noel-Tod], obituary for R.F. Langley. The Times, (3 March 2011): 54. [Discusses, int. al., the friendship between Langley and Prynne and their early studies and travels to Italy]. Online, at http://store3.thetimes.co.uk/, but paid registration is required to read the article in full.

Peter Riley, ‘RF Langley obituary’. The Guardian, (7 March 2011): 41. Online at http://www.theguardian.com/books/2011/mar/07/rf-langley-obituary. [Discusses, int. al., the friendship between Langley and Prynne, their early studies and travels to Italy, and appreciations of stone-carving].

David Grundy, review of Michael Pisaro’s audio CD Fields Have Ears (Another Timbre, November 2010). Eartrip, 6 (March 2011): [n.p.] [approx. 118–21] [120]. Online at https://ia600406.us.archive.org/6/items/eartrip_magazine/Eartrip6.pdf. [Quotes from J.H. Prynne, ‘Airport Poem: Ethics of Survival’].

Emily Witt, ‘That Room in Cambridge’. n + 1, 11 (Spring 2011): 73–98. An excerpt of this article is online at http://www.poetryfoundation.org/article/241414 [approx. pp. 7]. [American first-person travelogue about ‘the cult of J.H. Prynne’].

Anthony Barnett, ‘I Have Never Written a Surrealist Poem in My Life’, from the set ‘17 Poems of Defencelessness’. Tears in the Fence, 53 (Spring 2011): 8. Reprinted in Anthony Barnett, Antonyms & Others (Lewes, East Sussex: Allardyce Book, 2012): 53. Further reprinted in Anthony Barnett, Poems & (Lewes, East Sussex: Tears in the Fence in assoc. with Allardyce Book ABP, 2012): 603. [The poem refers to J.H. Prynne, News of Warring Clans. On first publication in Tears in the Fence, the title of the set was mistakenly published as ‘17 Poems of Defenselessness’, while the reference to Prynne contained the mistake of a crucial word, ‘of’, unitalicised].

Fiona Moore, ‘Why does nobody read J H Prynne?’ Displacement blog, (2 June 2011): online at http://displacement-poetry.blogspot.com/2011/06/why-does-nobody-read-j-h-prynne.html [approx. pp. 3, with pp. 3 of comments as of June 2016].

Daniel Boffey, ‘David Willetts’s former tutor says: “I have no confidence in him”’. The Observer, (Saturday 4 June 2011): 18. Online at http://www.theguardian.com/politics/2011/jun/04/david-willetts-former-tutor-no-confidence. [‘Almost 150 academics at Cambridge, including the renowned poet Jeremy Halvard Prynne, have signed a motion of no confidence in the minister.’].

Tom Raworth, ‘Prynnetout’ [or, perhaps, ‘Prynne Ting’] (c. 2006), online at http://tomraworth.com/dnldpaterson/plin.html. Posted on Raworth’s blog, http://tomraworth.com/notes/, (6 July 2011). [Regarding a poetry reading in Cambridge to mark the publication of J.H. Prynne, Pu Ling-en shi xuan: Han Ying dui zhao [ = Selected Poems by J.H. Prynne], ed. Ou Hong: ‘To celebrate this event I managed yesterday night to retrieve this small piece I made five or six years ago when D[on ]P[aterson] made one of those “now you can’t understand in two languages” arsehole remarks. Just click on the first image.’].

Tom Lowenstein, ‘Roger Langley’ [obituary]. PN Review, Vol. 37 No. 6 [Issue 200] (July–August 2011): 12–13 [13]. [Quotes from Prynne’s speech at Langley’s memorial service at St Andrew’s church, Bramfield, on 12 February 2011. Prynne’s speech at Langley’s memorial service is also quoted in Jeremy Noel-Tod, ‘Introduction’, in R.F. Langley, Complete Poems, ed. Jeremy Noel-Tod (Manchester: Carcanet Press, 2015): ix–xiv [xiii].

Ian Heames, Gloss to Carriers (Cambridge: Critical Documents, 2011): [n.p.] [9]. [On the page beginning ‘Attackships muzzled in chitin…’, line 32: ‘Holding a copy of The White Stones’].

Out To Lunch [Ben Watson], BLAKE (unpublished; written 2010–11 and privately distributed on data CDs in 2011): Plates 026–027, 112–13. [‘[…] the ultimate sexual point!!’ (cf. J.H. Prynne, ‘L’Extase de M. Poher’); ‘Prynne snapped “addict”, but | His fine-tuned solution to the persecuting guilt trap required no drug (or under the rug).’]. OTL’s full visual poem is also online as of July 2014 at http://www.militantesthetix.co.uk/blake/showcover.html [pp. 225].

Keston Sutherland, Stupefaction: A Radical Anatomy of Phantoms (London, New York, Calcutta: Seagull Books, 2011): 114, 117, 120, 147, 154n33, 162, 167, 184–86, 189, 211n6–7, 216n28, 218n50.

Rob Young, Electric Eden: Unearthing Britain’s Visionary Music (London: Faber & Faber, 2011): 299. [Mentions that Nick Drake, attending Cambridge University between 1967 and 1969, ‘shot the breeze on Trinity Street with the avant-garde poet J.H. Prynne’. See also Trevor Dann, Darker Than the Deepest Sea: The Search for Nick Drake (Cambridge, Massachusetts: Da Capo Press, 2006): 15, 51].

Geoff Nicholson, ‘“The Prynne and I”: Geoff Nicholson on Poet and Cambridge Institution J.H. Prynne’. In the Writers on Teachers series of the Los Angeles Review of Books blog, (6 September 2011), online at http://tumblr.lareviewofbooks.org/post/24379196477/the-prynne-and-i-geoff-nicholson-on-poet-and [approx. pp. 5]. [First-person account of Prynne as the author’s Director of Studies at Cambridge in the early 1970s].

Anna Mendelssohn [Grace Lake], ‘For J.H. Prynne.’. The Paper Nautilus, 2 (September 2011; eds. Rosa van Hensbergen and Laura Kilbride, Cambridge): 31. [A five-line poem by Mendelssohn [spelled ‘Mendelsohn’ in the handwritten manuscript from which this typed publication was prepared], previously unpublished, found among Mendelssohn’s posthumous papers. Undated; presumably from 1985 or later, when she began her studies at Cambridge University].

Anthony Barnett, ‘Blood on the Throat: On Aimé Césaire and D. S. Marriott’ [part of Barnett’s ‘Antonyms’ series]. Tears in the Fence, 54 (Autumn 2011): 156–58 [158]. Reprinted in his Antonyms Anew: Barbs & Loves (Lewes: Allardyce Book ABP, 2016): 33–36 [36]. [‘Marriott wrote his doctoral thesis on J. H. Prynne but his poetry is a far cry from Post-Prynnean Apostlyptic practice.’].

Nicholas Royle, Veering: A Theory of Literature (Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2011): 2, 43–45, 51, 52.

William Fuller, Hallucination (Chicago: Flood Editions, 2011): back cover. [Mentions that Prynne referred to Fuller as the ‘Secrecy Officer of American Poetry’].

Keith Tuma, On Leave: A Book of Anecdotes (Cambridge: Salt, 2011).

Keston Sutherland in interview with Laura Kilbride, ‘“Political all the way down”: Keston Sutherland on poetics, politics and community’. The Literateur, 25 November 2011: int. al. Online at http://literateur.com/interview-with-keston-sutherland/.

Lawrence Dunn, ‘Talk: Selma James and Jeremy Prynne at the Occupation’. Varsity, (29 November 2011). Online at http://www.varsity.co.uk/reviews/4157.

Ian Brinton, ‘“A common meeting point”: Andrew Crozier’s involvement with The English Intelligencer and The Wivenhoe Park Review’. PN Review, Vol. 38 No. 3 [203] (January–February 2012): 54–56.

Ben Watson, Music Fix (Glasgow: CCA (Centre for Contemporary Arts), February 2012 [misprinted as 2011]: [n.p.] [2]. [Pamphlet published as part of the exhibition Thinking Ourselves into Existence, curated by Psykick Dancehall and Jon Marshall, at the CCA, Glasgow, February 2012. ‘Music criticism not written from studious attention to Finnegans Wake and J.H. Prynne remains ignorant of the music in the scything word swords themselves, and can only ever be a fanboy add-on, a crinkly advertorial wrapper, a creeping footling bootlicking footnote.’].

Colleen Hindarm, ‘Commentary: “Amalthea Innoxia”’, in Megan Sword and Timpani Skullface, Superior City Song (Cambridge: Critical Documents, February 2012): [n.p.] [This commentary dated February 2011. ‘*Winja: The spirit of the City Superior’s “sacred river”, as also the river itself, so named after the rune meaning JOY, being “the specific rune of [the beloveds’] only tolerable condition.” Read J.H. Prynne’s “Pedantic Note in Two Parts” as soon as you possibly can.’].

Neil Pattison, ‘Introduction: “all flags left outside”’. Certain Prose of The English Intelligencer, eds. Neil Pattison, Reitha Pattison, Luke Roberts (Cambridge: Mountain Press, 2012/2014 (2nd ed.)): i–xxiv.

Mark Dickinson, ‘First of 3 READINGS’ [review of J.H. Prynne, Pearls That Were]. Intercapillary Space, (April 2012): online at http://intercapillaryspace.blogspot.com/2012/04/mark-dickinson-first-of-3-readings.html [approx. pp. 1].

Sean Bonney and David Grundy, ‘Listening through Live in Seattle: A Conversation (London, 8th January 2012)’. Eartrip, 7 (April 2012): [n.p.] [approx. 62–74 [71]. Online at https://ia600406.us.archive.org/6/items/eartrip_magazine/eartrip7.pdf. [Grundy in conversation quotes from J.H. Prynne, ‘Thoughts on the Esterházy Court Uniform’].

Andrew Crozier, An Andrew Crozier Reader, ed. Ian Brinton (Manchester: Carcanet Press, 2012). [In addition to reprinting J.H. Prynne’s introduction to Andrew Crozier, Loved Litter of Time Spent and quoting numerous letters, published and unpublished, from Prynne to Crozier, this book also includes excerpts of letters from Crozier to Prynne, and excerpts of Crozier’s discussions of Prynne in essays and interviews].

Anthony Barnett, ‘O Learning’, from the section ‘Unentitled’ in his Poems & (Lewes, East Sussex: Tears in the Fence in assoc. with Allardyce Book ABP, 2012): 643–44 [643]. [‘[…] While snow hums hums away at night – yes it does, anyone who has | truly lived with snow knows it […]’ alludes to Robert Nye’s criticism of the line ‘Still the snow hums, fetching my life:’ from J.H. Prynne, ‘Royal Fern’. [Robert Nye, ‘Poet of a living modernism’. The Times, [Issue 61339] (Thursday 16 September 1982): 6].

Edward Dorn, Collected Poems, ed. Jennifer Dunbar Dorn with Justin Katko, Reitha Pattison and Kyle Waugh (Manchester: Carcanet Press, 2012): 942 [‘Publication Histories’] notes that two previously uncollected poems, ‘Nature their passing bell: an atonement’ [p. 55] and ‘An Inauguration Poem’ [pp. 55–56], were from manuscripts held by Prynne.

Edward Dorn, ‘Day Report, 205th day’ and ‘On first reading The Glacial Question, Unsolved, again’ [from ‘The Day & Night Report’], in Edward Dorn, Two Interviews, eds. Gavin Selerie and Justin Katko (Bristol: Shearsman Books, 2012): 36 and 37, respectively. [An editors’ note on p. 37 mentions that these two poems are ‘transcribed from a letter from Dorn to J.H. Prynne (13 September 1971) [2 pp., MS], in the possession of J.H. Prynne.’]. ‘Day Report, 205th day’ reprinted as ‘Day 205’, in Edward Dorn, Derelict Air: From Collected Out, eds. Justin Katko and Kyle Waugh (London: Enitharmon Press, 2015): 270. [The editors’ notes on ‘Day 205’ in Derelict Air, p. 567, give further information about the poem: ‘MS (1 p.) in 2 pp. letter sent to J.H. Prynne, 13 September 1971, Chicago, held by J.H. Prynne, Binder D12 (February 1971 – October 1971).’]. ‘On first reading The Glacial Question, Unsolved, again’ reprinted as part of ‘203rd day – 162 days follow’, in Edward Dorn, Derelict Air: From Collected Out, eds. Justin Katko and Kyle Waugh (London: Enitharmon Press, 2015): 269. [The editors’ notes on ‘203rd day – 162 days follow’ in Derelict Air, p. 567, give further information about this poem: ‘TS (1 p.), inscribed to J.H. Prynne, 27 July 1971, Vancouver, held by J.H. Prynne, Binder D12 (February 1971 – October 1971).’].

Gavin Selerie, ‘Circumstance and Shadow-Track: Introduction to “The Riverside Interview”’, in Edward Dorn, Two Interviews, eds. Gavin Selerie and Justin Katko (Bristol: Shearsman Books, 2012): 39–61 [40, 42, 44, 52–53, 55, 60–61]. [Informative discussions of Prynne and Dorn’s friendship and influence upon each other’s poetry].

Edward Dorn, interviewed by Gavin Selerie, ‘The Riverside Interview’ (London, July 1981), in Edward Dorn, Two Interviews, eds. Gavin Selerie and Justin Katko (Bristol: Shearsman Books, 2012): 63–83 [68, 75–76]. [Dorn speaks of Prynne as his ‘second teacher – quite definitely after Olson – and in a way that Olson never was.’].

Harvey Joseph and Lindsay James, Sea Adventures, or, Pond Life (Cork, Ireland: RunAmok, 2012): [n.p.], endpapers [inside front cover and first page, and inside back cover and last page]. [A long list-form text of hundreds of persons and items at their going rates, including ‘jamie armchair – €6.50. jason hirons – €6.00. jewsharpists – €4.30. jeremy prynne – €4.50. jewfishes – €4.00. jim maughan – €6.50. jins-of-court – €6.00. open oysters – €4.50.’ The text on the opening endpapers is reproduced on the closing endpapers, so Prynne’s name appears on the inside front cover as well as on the final page].

Joshua Kotin, ‘The Anti-Review’, in Kent Johnson, A Question Mark Above the Sun: Documents on the Mystery Surrounding a Famous Poem “by” Frank O’Hara, expanded second edition (Buffalo, New York: Starcherone Books, 2012): 249–57.

Ron Paste, ‘Sunism for Kent Johnson’, in Kent Johnson, A Question Mark Above the Sun: Documents on the Mystery Surrounding a Famous Poem “by” Frank O’Hara, expanded second edition (Buffalo, New York: Starcherone Books, 2012): 259–62.

Niamh O’Mahony and Aliya Ram, ‘How Long is This?: A day of performances responding to the work of playwright Will Stuart’. Varsity, (6th May 2012), online at http://www.varsity.co.uk/culture/4705 [approx. pp. 2]. [Mentions Prynne’s involvement in the event How Long is This?, a day of performances of the work of Will Stuart on 27 April 2012. Includes Prynne’s description of Will Stuart as ‘a fertile writer’].

Eirik Steinhoff, A Fiery Flying Roule blog (2011 to the present). Online at http://afieryflyingroule.tumblr.com/. [In addition to publishing J.H. Prynne’s Letter to Kent Johnson (13 November 2011) in An Eleventh Fiery Flying Roule: To All the Inhabitants of the earth; Specially to the rich ones (19 November 2011): [4], Steinhoff posted, on 22 July 2012, links to J.H. Prynne, ‘No Universal Plan for a Good Life’, and comments by Prynne on a 2010 article on Nepal’s revolution [https://southasiarev.wordpress.com/2010/05/15/nepals-revolution-the-people-have-awakened-there-is-a-future-to-win/]. On 13 June 2013 Steinhoff posted, alongside a quote from J.H. Prynne, Kazoo Dreamboats; or, On What There Is, links to Steinhoff’s photographs of Prynne and other poets, presumably from Chicago in April 2009; Steinhoff also posted these photographs on Flickr, at https://www.flickr.com/photos/pannicle/3522778211/in/set-72157622547740629, https://www.flickr.com/photos/pannicle/3523586600/in/set-72157622547740629, and https://www.flickr.com/photos/pannicle/3523586288/in/set-72157622547740629].

Lindsey M. Freer, ‘Introduction’, in Edward Dorn, Charles Olson Memorial Lectures, ed. Lindsey M. Freer (New York: Lost and Found (CUNY Poetics Document Initiative), Fall 2012): 1–8 [2, 6, 8]. [This publication prints Lindsey M. Freer’s transcriptions of the first and third of the three lectures presented by Edward Dorn as part of the Charles Olson Memorial Lectures series. Freer’s ‘Introduction’ mentions Prynne in relation to these lectures, as Dorn read a letter from Prynne [dated 22nd February 1981] in the first lecture and discussed and read a paragraph from Prynne’s 27 July 1971 lecture at Simon Fraser University, ‘On Maximus IV, V, VI’, in the third lecture. Freer’s transcriptions of Dorn’s reading of these Prynne texts are printed in Charles Olson Memorial Lectures on pp. 27–31 and p. 34, respectively. Audio recordings of all three of Dorn’s lectures in the series are online at http://writing.upenn.edu/pennsound/x/Dorn.php].

David Grundy, ‘“A Form That’s Already Replaced You”: Against Kenny Goldsmith’. Streams of Expression blog, (11 October 2012): online at http://streamsofexpression.blogspot.com/2012/10/a-form-thats-already-replaced-you.html [approx. pp. 8]. [Includes brief thoughts on the opposition between Goldsmith’s ‘uncreative writing’ and Prynne’s dialectical philology].

Eirik Sommerfelt Steinhoff, The Sense of Chance in the English Renaissance (Unpublished Ph.D. Dissertation, University of Chicago, December 2012): 62 [discusses Robert Wyatt, ‘They fle from me | that sometyme did me seke’, in relation to Prynne’s analysis of ‘They’ in They That Haue Powre to Hurt; A Specimen of a Commentary on Shake-speares Sonnets, 94].

James Russell, Craigie’s Clevedon Poems (a novella with poems) (Newton-le-Willows, Merseyside: Knives Forks and Spoons Press, 2013): 17, 19, 36, 49, 50, 64, 65, 67, 68, 73, 80, 88, 106, 108, 110, 111, 119, 122, 133, 134–36, 142, 143, 153–55, 164–66, 168, 173–76, 180–81, 206, 210–12, 228, 245–47, 249–50, 267, 282–84 [appearances, parodies and discussions of Prynne as well as other poets and writers in the course of a digressive satirical narrative].

David Grundy, ‘How Long Is This? [The Theatre of Will Stuart] – Judith E Wilson Drama Studio, Cambridge :: Friday 27th April 2012’. Materials, 2 (March 2013: The Theatre Issue!): 110–15. [Mentions Prynne’s day-long attendance of the titular event dedicated to the theatre of Will Stuart, as well as discussions initiated by Prynne regarding Stuart’s use of pop music in the plays]. Online at the Streams of Expression blog, (7 May 2012), at http://streamsofexpression.blogspot.com/2012/05/how-long-is-this-theatre-of-will-stuart.html, with one fascinating addition [‘Well, in any case, watching J.H. Prynne blow up almost an entire four-foot inflatable dinosaur was a nigh-on unsurpassed public event.’].

David Grundy, ‘Starcrusher Night: Cambridge, 09.03.13’. Streams of Expression blog, (15 March 2013): online at http://streamsofexpression.blogspot.com/2013/03/starcrusher-night-cambridge-090313.html [approx. pp. 13]. [Includes brief thoughts on J.H. Prynne, Kazoo Dreamboats; or, On What There Is].

Zhang Guangkui, ‘Recommendation of English Poets and Poems: J.H. Prynne’. Verse Version, Vol. 2 No. 1 (March 2013; chief ed. Zhang Guangkui, [Guangdong, P.R. China]): 52–53. [Introduction, in English translation [52] and in Chinese [53], to a selection [on pp. 54–69] of J.H. Prynne’s poems in English and in Chinese translation by English Poetry Studies Institute. [The selected poems and their translations are reprinted from Pu Ling-en shi xuan: Han Ying dui zhao [ = Selected Poems by J.H. Prynne], ed. Ou Hong]].

Iain Sinclair, ‘Dysfunctional Troglodytes with Mail-Order Weaponry’ [review of Edward Dorn, Collected Poems, ed. Jennifer Dunbar Dorn with Justin Katko, Reitha Pattison and Kyle Waugh (Manchester: Carcanet Press, 2012)]. London Review of Books, Vol. 35 No. 7 (11 April 2013): 35–38. Also online at http://www.lrb.co.uk/v35/n07/iain-sinclair/dysfunctional-troglodytes-with-mail-order-weaponry. [Mentions, alongside several other Prynne references, that ‘Prynne took Dorn to Northampton to investigate the asylum where [John Clare] spent his last years.’ This trip is presumably the same one which is the subject of Edward Dorn, ‘AN ACCOUNT OF A TRIP WITH JEREMY PRYNNE IN JANUARY, 1992, THROUGH THE CLARE COUNTRY’, posthumously published in Derelict Air: From Collected Out, eds. Justin Katko and Kyle Waugh (London: Enitharmon Press, 2015): 491–92, with a textual note by the editors on 579 that the poem was dated January 1992 in an unpublished typescript (pp. 2) held by Jennifer Dunbar Dorn].

George Leutz, ‘The Longest Arcade Marathon’. Online at http://animalizedmenwrigglingeerily.blogspot.com/2013/04/the-longest-arcade-marathon.html [posted 23 April 2013; written March 2013]. [Approx. pp. 31]. [An autobiographical account of Leutz’s world-record-setting Q*Bert arcade game marathon [84 hours and 48 minutes], including a Photoshopped parody cover of J.H. Prynne, Kazoo Dreamboats; or, On What There Is].

Aliya Ram, ‘The Infra-Avant-Garde’. The Inkling, (27 June [2013]): online at http://www.theinklingmag.com/ink-other-animals/the-infra-avant-garde/ [approx. pp. 7, with useful comments section].

Ian Heames, TO. (Cambridge: [self published], July 2013; reprinted in Brighton: Iodine Press, September 2013): [n.p.], ‘2.1.1’. Further reprinted in Ian Heames, Arrays (Cambridge: Face Press, April 2015): 48. [The poem opens: ‘They that have power to hurt | The solitary reaper | They get some of their dolphins’].

Josef Kaplan, Kill List (Baltimore, Maryland: Cars Are Real, 2013): 45. [Among 232 lines, each of which names a contemporary poet and then follows that name with either the phrase ‘is a rich poet’ or ‘is comfortable’: ‘J.H. Prynne is a rich poet.’]. Cf. Rose Arthur’s subsequent ‘Reading List’. Hyperallergic, (1 December 2013), online at http://hyperallergic.com/95889/reading-list/ [which reproduces Kaplan’s list of names and replaces Kaplan’s line-endings with either the phrase ‘is well worth reading’ or ‘is an underrated poet’].

John Kinsella, Spatial Relations: Essays, Reviews, Commentaries, and Chorography, ed. Gordon Collier (2 vols., Vol. 2; Amsterdam, New York: Rodopi, 2013): 32, 44, 74, 121, 494.

Nathan Hamilton, ‘INTRODUCTION: Fossils on Mars’. Dear World & Everyone in It: New Poetry in the UK, ed. Nathan Hamilton (Tarset, Northumberland: Bloodaxe Books, 2013): 15–30 [17, 19].

Matthew Hofer, ‘Introduction: “Few / People are lost as I am”: Ed Dorn through the Great Basin-Plateau’, in Edward Dorn and Leroy Lucas, The Shoshoneans: The People of the Basin-Plateau, Expanded Edition, ed. Matthew Hofer (Albuquerque, New Mexico: University of New Mexico Press, 2013): 97–110 [104, 110]. [quotes from J.H. Prynne’s ‘Afterword’ in Edward Dorn, Collected Poems, ed. Jennifer Dunbar Dorn with Justin Katko, Reitha Pattison and Kyle Waugh (Manchester: Carcanet Press, 2012): 938–41 [941]; and quotes from an unpublished poem by Edward Dorn, [‘my wandering’] (19 August 1966), printed in full on p. 115 of the Expanded Edition of The Shoshoneans, as the final stanza of a poem dedicated to J.H.P., ‘a Poem entitled Bullshit’ (27 July 1966). Note that these materials are not in the original edition of the book (i.e., Edward Dorn and Leroy Lucas, The Shoshoneans: People of the Basin-Plateau (New York: William Morrow and Company, Inc., 1966)). ‘a Poem entitled Bullshit’ and [‘my wandering’] are reprinted in Edward Dorn, Derelict Air: From Collected Out, eds. Justin Katko and Kyle Waugh (London: Enitharmon Press, 2015): 172, with notes on 563].

Tom Clark, letter to Ed Dorn (9 January 1965), in Edward Dorn and Leroy Lucas, The Shoshoneans: The People of the Basin-Plateau, Expanded Edition, ed. Matthew Hofer (Albuquerque, New Mexico: University of New Mexico Press, 2013): 117–18 [117]. [Clark discusses seeing Prynne to learn which of Dorn’s poems remain unpublished, in order to publish them in Paris Review (where Clark served as poetry editor from 1963 to 1973). Note that this letter is not in the original edition of the book (i.e., Edward Dorn and Leroy Lucas, The Shoshoneans: People of the Basin-Plateau (New York: William Morrow and Company, Inc., 1966))].

Ed Dorn, letter to Robert Creeley (12–13 April 1965), in Edward Dorn and Leroy Lucas, The Shoshoneans: The People of the Basin-Plateau, Expanded Edition, ed. Matthew Hofer (Albuquerque, New Mexico: University of New Mexico Press, 2013): 119–20 [120]. [Mentions that Dorn was ‘offered a job teaching at the New University of Essex by [Donald] Davie, thru Prynne’. Note that this letter is not in the original edition of the book (i.e., Edward Dorn and Leroy Lucas, The Shoshoneans: People of the Basin-Plateau (New York: William Morrow and Company, Inc., 1966))].

Judah Raanan Rubin, Phrenologue (Brooklyn, New York: Ugly Duckling Press, 2013). [Quotes from J.H. Prynne, ‘Crown’, as one of two epigraphs].

Boyd Nielson and Richard Owens, ‘Combatida Ternura’ [an email correspondence from late-August through mid-October 2013, posted to the Revolution and/or Poetry conference website on 22 October 2013]. Online at http://revolutionandorpoetry.files.wordpress.com/2013/10/nielson-owens-dialog-final.pdf [approx. pp. 9]. [Owens discusses, particularly towards the end, Prynne’s concept of poetic form as quoted from J.H. Prynne, George Herbert, ‘Love [III]’: A Discursive Commentary, positing that Prynne’s concept ‘offers a refreshingly affirmative corrective to activist poets whose abysmally uninspired imaginings of poetry compel them only to paradoxically instrumentalize and deride the productive capacity of poetry, thereby diminishing the affective and intellectual energies latent within the poetic.’].

Verity Spott, ‘From a Call(ish)’. Two Torn Halves blog, (14 November 2013): online at http://twotornhalves.blogspot.co.uk/2013/11/from-callish.html [approx. pp. 2]. [‘… stupid town of my <3 <3 sing with me stamner crock of catheter soul with signing us suck | of balloon bile I saw gently prynne with me Isis skim in the lizard’s fire skip to the duct | where a patient ward-waltzes trapped in the catheter stage of teenage love examination and | as she pulls up to the window stares down to amassed cars, curls up by amassed windows | sings …’].

Lila Matsumoto, review of SNOW, lit rev, 1 (Spring 2013; eds. Anthony Barnett and Ian Brinton). Hix Eros, 2 (November 2013): 28–30 [29]. Online at https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/5332918/HIX%20EROS%202.pdf. [Includes a brief discussion of Prynne’s ‘A Letter about Paul Celan’ published in the journal].

Josh Stanley, review of John Wilkinson, Reckitt’s Blue (Chicago: Seagull Books, 2012). Hix Eros, 2 (November 2013): 44–51 [49–51]. Online at https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/5332918/HIX%20EROS%202.pdf. [Discusses how Wilkinson’s poem engages with Prynne’s work, making comparisons with J.H. Prynne, ‘As It Were, An Attendant’ and Field Notes: ‘The Solitary Reaper’ and Others].

Megan Zword, review of Emily Critchley, Love / All That / & OK (London: Penned in the Margins, 2011). Hix Eros, 2 (November 2013): 53–84 [59]. Online at https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/5332918/HIX%20EROS%202.pdf. [A brief discussion on the influence of punctuation, specifically from the tildes in the title of J.H. Prynne, Streak~~~Willing~~~Entourage / ‘Artesian’].

Amiri Baraka and Edward Dorn, The Collected Letters, ed. Claudia Moreno Pisano (Albuquerque, New Mexico: University of New Mexico Press, 2013): 77, 82, 84, 87, 102, 166, 187. [Various mentions of Prynne in relation to Prynne’s attempts to find a publisher for Dorn’s poems in England, and of Prynne’s part in arranging for Dorn to move to England].

Peter Riley, ‘Lyric, anti-lyric and political poetry’ [a review of books by Simon Perril, Anthony Mellors, John Mateer and Andrew McMillan]. The Fortnightly Review, (22 January 2014): online at http://fortnightlyreview.co.uk/2014/01/lyricism/ [approx. pp. 10]. [Includes a critical discussion of what it means to be ‘influenced responsibly by Prynne’].

Robin Purves, review of Sous les Pavés, 3 (2011; ed. Micah Robbins). Hix Eros, 3 (January 2014): 50–62 [54]. Online at https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/5332918/HIX%20EROS%203.pdf [Quotes and discusses Prynne’s comments on David Willetts’s 3rd March 2011 talk in Cambridge concerning ‘The Coalition’s Vision for Science and Technology’, previously online at http://www.defendeducation.co.uk/jeremy-prynne-on-david-willetts-talk-the-coalitions-vision-forscience-and-technology in 2011].

Ian Brinton, review of Peter Hughes, Allotment Architecture (Hastings: Reality Street, 2013). Shearsman Books blog, (15 March 2014): online at http://www.shearsman.com/ws-blog/post/366-peter-hughes-allotment-architecture [approx. pp. 2]. [includes a quotation from Prynne’s unpublished notes for students, ‘On the Outlook and Procedures of the Post-Romantic Mind’ (November 1968)].

Ian Brinton, [unknown title] [review of a new Bookmarks series concerning World War I]. The Use of English, Vol. 65 No. 2 (Spring 2014): 85–89. [includes a quotation from J.H. Prynne’s unpublished essay ‘War in Arcady: Edmund Blunden’s Undertones’. Morag Morris Poetry Lecture, 8 October 2009, University of Surrey].

Will Stuart, Nine Plays, ed. Ian Heames (Cambridge: Face Press, 2014). [The front cover image, as noted on the copyright page, is ‘taken from a video of Iphigenia, by Will Stuart and Ian Heames, performed at How Long is This?, a day of performance, film and discussion dedicated to the works of Will Stuart, held at the Judith E. Wilson Drama Studio, Faculty of English, 9 West Road, Cambridge, on 27th April 2012. Stuart is reading J.H. Prynne’s “Letter to John Wilkinson” [8th August 2004]; Heames flies the helicopter.’ On p. 222, in the play ‘Another Play’ (181–272; written February 2011 and performed at the Fifth Annual Miscellaneous Theatre Festival at the Judith E. Wilson Drama Studio, 14th–18th March 2011, in a single performance serialised over five evenings), the character ‘Interventor under the Script’ reads a poem called ‘I Am Become Prynne’ by ‘William Fergus Prynne’. On p. 260, in the same play, the character ‘Jay’ quotes from Jeremy Prynne ‘about a human body being the figure of the entire world.’]. Nine Plays also contains J.H. Prynne’s ‘Afterword: Will Stuart and the Play of Wills’ on pp. 345–49.

Peter Riley, [‘Jeremy Prynne…’], one of ‘Four 12-Line Poems’. Poetry Salzburg Review, 25 (Spring 2014): 6.

Joe Luna, ‘Poetry and the Fantasy of Totality’. All Over the Grid blog, (12 April 2014; first presented at the ACLA seminar ‘Poetry and Capital(i)s(m)’, 21 March 2014): online at http://fallopianyoutube.blogspot.co.uk/2014/04/poetry-and-fantasy-of-totality.html [approx. pp. 5]. [includes a critical discussion of J.H. Prynne, ‘On the Anvil’].

Ian Friend, ‘Six Works in Response to Poetics’. Cordite Poetry Review, Vol. 46 No. 0 (1 May 2014: No Theme III; ed. Felicity Plunkett): online at http://cordite.org.au/ekphrasis/six-works-response/ [approx. pp. 6]. [Begins with a brief description of Friend’s artistic practice of working ‘allusively in relation to poetic texts’, and especially to those of J.H. Prynne. Six images are reproduced on separate webpages: ‘A Precipitation of Fallen Angels’ (2012), ‘Song in Sight of the World’ (2007), ‘Star Damage at Home’ (2007), ‘The White Stones’ (2007), ‘Tracing the Paths of Memory, Biting the Air #2’ (2009) and ‘Tracing the Paths of Memory, Biting the Air #5’ (2010). Friend’s introductory text mentions that the title of the first image is actually a reference to Samuel Taylor Coleridge’s 1802 journal, and from Friend’s comment it seems that Prynne is in possession of this artwork].

Peter Riley, ‘Poetry south of the Antilles’ [review of books by Kei Miller, Loretta Collins Klobah and D.S. Marriott]. The Fortnightly Review, (7 June 2014): online at http://fortnightlyreview.co.uk/2014/06/caribbean-poets/ [approx. pp. 13]. [Includes a paragraph on D.S. Marriott’s evolution as a poet in relation to Prynne’s influence].

Ian Brinton, ‘Andrew Crozier and his Papers’. Cambridge University Library Poetry Archives Newsletter, 1 (Autumn 2014): 3–4.

Ian Brinton, ‘John Riley and his Papers’. Cambridge University Library Poetry Archives Newsletter, 1 (Autumn 2014): 4–5.

Kenneth Irby, ‘Twelve letters from Kenneth Irby to Edward Dorn – April 8, 1963’, in the feature ‘On Kenneth Irby’, eds. Kyle Waugh and William J. Harris. Jacket 2, (18 November 2014), online at http://jacket2.org/article/april-8-1963. [‘I saw a letter in Gordon Cairnie’s book shop the other day from a J. Prynne in England (Cambridge?) who had been here last year – & he mentioned he had a book of yrs in manuscript trying to get it published in England […]’].

Ed Luker, ‘Pouring One Out for the Petit-Bourgeoisie’, in A Comradeship of Heroes from Around the World [a magazine to coincide with the ‘Rivet Christ Mass’ poetry reading at 16 Wild’s Rents, Bermondsey, London on 20 December 2014, printed in Cambridge [by David Grundy], December 2014]: [n.p.] [16]. Also published in a slightly earlier draft on Ed Luker’s blog, Dumbflux, (12 December 2014): online at http://dumbflux.tumblr.com/post/105008019921. [Luker’s poem includes three lines quoted from J.H. Prynne, ‘Questions for the Time Being’. Luker’s poem is also recounted in David Grundy, ‘RIVET CHRIST MASS, 20/12/2014 // JACK FROST CHRISTINA CHALMERS CONNIE SCOZZARO DANNY HAYWARD ( + ED LUKER & JOSH STANLEY) // 16 WILD’S RENTS, BERMONDSEY’. Streams of Expression blog, (24 December 2014): online at http://streamsofexpression.blogspot.co.uk/2014/12/rivet-christ-mass-20122014-jack-frost.html [approx. pp. 8], where, in Grundy’s description, ‘probably the most memorable incident, and a somewhat puzzling one, features [Iain] Sinclair’s severed robotic head speaking lines from J.H. Prynne’s “Questions for the Time Being”, a poem first published in The English Intelligencer in 1968 which critically considers the self-characterisation of a poetic “underground” within that “community of risk”’].

Edward Dorn, Derelict Air: From Collected Out, eds. Justin Katko and Kyle Waugh (London: Enitharmon Press, 2015). The following previously unpublished poems by Edward Dorn directly reference J.H. Prynne: ‘This is the Poem for John W.’ [written on the front of an envelope of a letter from J.H. Prynne to Edward Dorn, postmarked 7 July 1966; reproduced in facsimile on p. 169; from Letters of Edward Dorn to John Wieners, Series 1, Box 1, Folder 1, Sir Joseph Gold literary manuscript collection (MSS 658), Special Collections, University of Delaware Library]; ‘On first reading “As It Were An Attendant”’ [28 October 1967, unpublished typescript (pp. 1) [the title has been applied by the editors]; p. 174; from J.H. Prynne, Binder D7 (October 1967 – May 1968) [private archive]]; ‘July 19th’ [from ‘The Day & Night Report’ (1971), in Dorn’s daybook for 1971; p. 268; from Box 40, Notebook ‘Thor’ (1971), Edward Dorn Papers, Archives & Special Collections at the Thomas J. Dodd Research Center, University of Connecticut Libraries]; ‘203rd day – 162 days follow’ [from ‘The Day & Night Report’ (1971), 27 July 1971, typescript (pp. 1) inscribed to J.H. Prynne; p. 269; from Binder D12 (February 1971 – October 1971) [regarding J.H. Prynne, ‘The Glacial Question, Unsolved’]]; ‘Day 230’ [from ‘The Day & Night Report’ (1971), from unpublished manuscript alongside five other ‘Day & Night Report’ entries (pp. 6); pp. 273–74; from Box 40, Notebook ‘Thor’ (1971), Edward Dorn Papers, Archives & Special Collections at the Thomas J. Dodd Research Center, University of Connecticut Libraries]; ‘Theater of Money #3’ [20 August 1971, unpublished and labeled manuscript (pp. 1), Day 232 [from ‘The Day & Night Report’ (1971)]; p. 308; from Box 40, Notebook ‘Thor’ (1971), Edward Dorn Papers, Archives & Special Collections at the Thomas J. Dodd Research Center, University of Connecticut Libraries]; ‘Poem sent to J.H. Prynne’ [undated, unpublished manuscript (pp. 1) in 19 September 1972 letter to J.H. Prynne [the title has been applied by the editors]; p. 347; from Binder D14 (May 1972 – February 1973)]; and ‘AN ACCOUNT OF A TRIP WITH JEREMY PRYNNE IN JANUARY, 1992, THROUGH THE CLARE COUNTRY’ [January 1992, unpublished typescript (pp. 2); pp. 491–92; held by Jennifer Dunbar Dorn]. Also, ‘Day 92 – 273 days coming’ and ‘181’, from ‘The Day & Night Report’ (1971), on pp. 247–48 and p. 268 respectively, mention Prynne, but were previously published as part of Ed Dorn, ‘from The Day & Night Book’, in All Stars, ed. Tom Clark (Santa Fe: Goliard / New York: Grossman, 1972): 101–31 [103–04, 131]; and reprinted as Ed Dorn, from The Day & Night Book (Toronto: shuffaloff / Eternal Network Joint #6, February 2014): 7–8, 35.

Edward Dorn, Derelict Air: From Collected Out, eds. Justin Katko and Kyle Waugh (London: Enitharmon Press, 2015). The following previously unpublished poems and other items by Edward Dorn were supplied to the editors by J.H. Prynne from his private archive: photograph of Edward Dorn [September 1966; p. 2; from J.H. Prynne, Binder D5 (July 1966 – December 1966)]; Edward Dorn letter to J.H. Prynne, 1 October 1963 [quoted on pp. 16 and 559; from Binder D1 (November 1961 – March 1964)]; ‘The 6th’ of ‘TEN COMMUNICATIONS from the WEST’ [from an unpublished typescript with handwritten revisions including revised title ‘For Ray’ (pp. 1); pp. 98–99; from Binder D1B (undated)]; ‘For Nevada’ [from an unpublished typescript (pp. 1) in an early manuscript of Hands Up!; p. 114; from Binder D1B (undated)]; ‘DOGS OF THE FALLING SUN’ [c. 1962, unpublished typescript (pp. 1) in an early manuscript of Hands Up!; p. 115; from Binder D1B (undated)]; Edward Dorn letter to J.H. Prynne, 26 April 1963 [quoted on p. 558; from Binder D1 (November 1961 – March 1964)]; ‘The Vague Love’ [c. October 1962, unpublished typescript (pp. 2) included under the heading ‘THE NEWLY FALLEN: Additional Poems’; pp. 124–25; from Binder D1A (undated)]; ‘Bob Considine’ [c. October 1962, unpublished typescript (pp. 1) included under the heading ‘THE NEWLY FALLEN: Additional Poems’; p. 126; from Binder D1A (undated)]; ‘For Soblen’ [c. October 1962, unpublished typescript (pp. 1) included under the heading ‘THE NEWLY FALLEN: Additional Poems’; p. 126; from Binder D1A (undated)]; ‘Donald is insane they say (after James Whitcomb Riley’ [13 October 1962, unpublished typescript (pp. 1); pp. 127–28; from Binder D1B (undated)]; ‘Death was a dream’ [24 October 1962, unpublished typescript with handwritten revisions (pp. 1); p. 131; from Binder D1B (undated)]; ‘Some aid to the needy’ [25 October 1962, unpublished typescript (pp. 1); p. 132; from Binder D1B (undated)]; ‘When I met Red’ [c. October 1962, unpublished typescript (pp. 2); pp. 132–34; from Binder D1B (undated)]; ‘SO LONG CUBA: LETTER TO FIDEL CASTRO OCT 29, 1962 OR: JUST ONE MORE INEFFECTUALITY FROM A POET?’ [29 October 1962, unpublished typescript with handwritten revisions (pp. 3); pp. 135–37; from Binder D1B (undated)]; ‘Chansonette forever’ [c. October 1962, unpublished typescript with handwritten revisions (pp. 1); p. 138; from Binder D1B (undated)]; ‘FOR JIMMIE WORKMAN, THE BANDIT, CAUGHT IN PHOENIX’ [5 November 1962, unpublished typescript with handwritten revisions (pp. 1); the final stanza has been reconstructed by the editors from crossed-out lines and marginalia in dated manuscript (pp. 2); pp. 139–40; typescript and manuscript from Binder D1B (undated)]; ‘A campaign of January 17: IT IS TOO LATE FOR THEM TO SEND THEIR ARMIES’ [17 January 1963, unpublished typescript with handwritten revisions (pp. 1); p. 140; from Binder D1B (undated)]; ‘After Love (for R.C.’ [2 April 1963, unpublished typescript with handwritten revisions (pp. 1); p. 142; from Binder D1B (undated)]; ‘ON NO (for Tom Raworth’ [13 April 1963, unpublished typescript with handwritten revisions (pp. 1); p. 143; from Binder D1B (undated)]; ‘AN OLD SQUARE POEM’ [21 April 1963, unpublished typescript with handwritten revisions (pp. 1), and variant typescript with handwritten revisions (pp. 1); p. 145; both typescripts from Binder D1B (undated)]; ‘The Territories’ [21 April 1963, dated manuscript (pp. 1); pp. 146–47; from Binder D1B (undated)]; [‘and still finding’] [5 May 1963, unpublished manuscript (pp. 2); pp. 147–48; from Binder D1B (undated)]; ‘BUT THEN AGAIN’ [c. after November 1963, unpublished typescript (pp. 2) and draft typescript with handwritten revisions (pp. 2); pp. 149–51; both typescripts from Binder D1B (undated)]; ‘A Circle of Songs’ [sequence of ten poems written January–April 1964, all of which, with the exception of [‘My Gods’], derive from unpublished typescript (pp. 12) held by Prynne; pp. 155–64; from Binder D1B (undated)]; ‘a Poem entitled Bullshit’ [27 July 1966, manuscript (pp. 1); p. 172; from Binder D5 (July 1966 – December 1966)]; ‘On first reading “As It Were An Attendant”’ [28 October 1967, unpublished typescript (pp. 1) [the title has been applied by the editors]; p. 174; from Binder D7 (October 1967 – May 1968)]; ‘ONCE, AGAIN’ [c. 10 June 1968, unpublished typescript (pp. 2); pp. 174–76; from Binder D8 (May 1968 – January 1969)]; [‘(Everything says to Lil, as of what I don’t recall –’] [poem from a project Dorn called ‘LIL’S BOOK’, undated, unpublished typescript (pp. 1) in a 17 October 1970 letter (pp. 2) to J.H. Prynne; p. 203; from Binder D11 (April 1970 – January 1971)]; ‘203rd day – 162 days follow’ [from ‘The Day & Night Report’ (1971), 27 July 1971, typescript (pp. 1) inscribed to J.H. Prynne; p. 269; from Binder D12 (February 1971 – October 1971)]; ‘Day 205’ [from ‘The Day & Night Report’ (1971), manuscript (pp. 1) in a 13 September 1971 letter (pp. 2) sent to J.H. Prynne; p. 270; from Binder D12 (February 1971 – October 1971)]; ‘Poem sent to J.H. Prynne’ [undated, unpublished manuscript (pp. 1) in 19 September 1972 letter to J.H. Prynne [the title has been applied by the editors]; p. 347; from Binder D14 (May 1972 – February 1973)]; ‘The Place is Grand’ [December 1972, unpublished manuscript (pp. 1) sent to J.H. Prynne; p. 356; from Binder D14 (May 1972 – February 1973) [the editors note, on p. 570, that J.H. Prynne responded in late December 1972 with the poem ‘Thanks for the Memory’]]; and ‘Thursday, the 5th of February, and still no paycheck’ [5 February 1976, unpublished typescript (pp. 1) in a letter (pp. 2) to J.H. Prynne; p. 380; from Binder D20 (January 1976 – December 1976)].

Gavin Selerie, ‘From Weymouth back: Olson’s British contacts, travels and legacy’, in Contemporary Olson, ed. David Herd (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2015): 113–26.

Elaine Feinstein, ‘A fresh look at Olson’, in Contemporary Olson, ed. David Herd (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2015): 127–32.

Iain Sinclair, ‘On the back of the elephant: riding with Charles Olson’, in Contemporary Olson, ed. David Herd (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2015): 297–307.

Neil Astley, ‘Introduction’. Ploughshares, Vol. 41 No. 1 [126] (Spring 2015): 10–12 [12]. Also online at https://www.pshares.org/issues/spring-2015/introduction. [approx. pp. 2] [Mentions towards the end that several poets whose work Astley especially wanted to represent had no previously unpublished poems to offer, and lists Prynne among fifteen others].

Anthony Mellors, ‘Modernism after Modernism’, in A History of Modernist Poetry, eds. Alex Davis and Lee M. Jenkins (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2015): 481–501 [494–96].

Dominic Hand and Sofía Crespi de Valldaura, ‘“If I write about destruction it’s because I’m terrified of it”: An Interview with Geoffrey Hill’. The ISIS, (27 April 2015), online at http://isismagazine.org.uk/ [approx. pp. 19]. [Hill: ‘With the greatest respect, I think Prynne and I have gone our separate ways. He’s certainly not interested in what I do and I’m not terribly interested in what he does.’].

Matt[hew] Hall, ‘“What Those Who Receive Do”’ [review of Certain Prose of The English Intelligencer, eds. Neil Pattison, Reitha Pattison and Luke Roberts (Cambridge: Mountain Press, 2012/2014 (2nd ed.))]. VLAK: Contemporary Poetics and the Arts, 5 (May 2015): 416–18. 

David Wheatley, ‘The ultimate poet of “anti-pathos”’ [review of J.H. Prynne, Poems [2015]]. The Guardian, (8 May 2015): [unknown page numbers], online at http://www.theguardian.com/books/2015/may/08/poems-jh-prynne-review [approx. pp. 2].

Jeremy Noel-Tod, ‘In his own world’ [review of J.H. Prynne, Poems [2015]]. The Sunday Times, (10 May 2015): 32. Excerpted online at http://www.thesundaytimes.co.uk/sto/culture/books/fiction/article1552678.ece, though as with all the Times publications a paid subscription is required to read the full article.

London Review Bookshop, ‘New and Recommended Poetry’. Online at http://www.londonreviewbookshop.co.uk/on-our-shelves/on-our-tables/new-and-recommended-poetry. [As of 11 May 2015, Prynne’s Poems [2015] was listed ten times by the London Review Bookshop under the heading ‘If you’re only going to buy ten poetry books, here’s what we’d recommend.’ The site has since been updated, so this particular recommendation is no longer available; though for September 2015 they’re promoting J.H. Prynne, Al-Dente: http://www.londonreviewbookshop.co.uk/blog/2015/9/al-dente].

Alison Flood, ‘Betty Trask award goes to Ben Fergusson’s “grittily evocative” debut’. The Guardian, (26 June 2015): [unknown page numbers]. Online at http://www.theguardian.com/books/2015/jun/26/betty-trask-award-ben-fergussons-debut-novel [approx. pp. 1]. [‘Other prize recipients included the poets Patience Agbabi, Brian Catling, Christopher Middleton, Pascale Petit and JH Prynne, who all received a £1,500 Cholmondeley award to recognise their “achievement and distinction”.’].

Emily Critchley, ‘Nature’s bequest gives nothing but doth lend’, from ‘Translations of Shakespeare’s sonnets, and five more poems.’ The Fortnightly Review, (14 July 2015): online at http://fortnightlyreview.co.uk/2015/07/translations-poems/ [approx. pp. 6]. [‘Selfish – though lovely! You, remove | yrself frm circulation, like a Prynne | poem, when the market craves the body | of yr works. […]’].

Megan Zword, review of ‘The Hunter-Gatherers’ by Karen Veitch. Hix Eros, 6 (August 2015): 72–86 [75]. Online at https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/5332918/HIX%20EROS%206.pdf. [Quotes a paragraph from J.H. Prynne, ‘Huts’].

Lila Matsumoto, conference report on the ‘Work, Performance & Poetry’ Symposium at Northumbria University (16–17 April 2015). Journal of British and Irish Innovative Poetry, Vol. 7 No. 1 (2015): 1–12, online at https://poetry.openlibhums.org/articles/10.16995/biip.7/. [Includes brief descriptions of two unpublished papers that discuss Prynne in detail: Christopher Earley’s ‘The Poet and the Engineer – Writing Infrastructure and Matter’ [on p. 6] and Lisa Jeschke’s ‘Women/ Work/ Songs in J.H. Prynne’s Field Notes’ [on p. 10]].

Nava Fader, Prynne Poems (Buffalo and Syracuse, New York: PressBoardPress, 2015).

Jeremy Noel-Tod, ‘Introduction’, in R.F. Langley, Complete Poems, ed. Jeremy Noel-Tod (Manchester: Carcanet Press, 2015): ix–xiv. [Discusses Prynne and Langley’s friendship, and also [on p. xiii] quotes from Prynne’s speech at Langley’s memorial service at St Andrew’s church, Bramfield, on 12 February 2011. Prynne’s speech at Langley’s memorial service is quoted further in Tom Lowenstein, ‘Roger Langley’ [obituary]. PN Review, Vol. 37 No. 6 [Issue 200] (July–August 2011): 12–13 [13]. Note also that the inside cover flap of Langley’s Complete Poems contains a note on Roger Langley by J.H. Prynne].

Charlotte Runcie, ‘Five contemporary poets worth reading on World Poetry Day’. The Telegraph, (8 October 2015): [unknown page numbers], online at http://www.telegraph.co.uk/books/what-to-read/national-poetry-day-five-best-living-poets/ [approx. pp. 6]. [Includes Prynne among the poets worth reading, and quotes from ‘Smaller than the Radius of the Planet’].

John Kerrigan, Jeremy Noel-Tod, et al., ‘Books of the Year’. TLS [Times Literary Supplement], (27 November 2015): 8–16 [on p. 12 Kerrigan lists J.H. Prynne, Poems [2015] among the year’s best books; on p. 14 Noel-Tod lists J.H. Prynne, Poems [2015] among the year’s best books].

Craig Raine, ‘Sean O’Brien’. Areté: The Arts Tri-Quarterly, 48 (Winter 2015): [unknown page numbers]. Online at http://www.aretemagazine.co.uk/latest-issue/sean-obrien/. [The final paragraph of this otherwise unrelated article compares supporters of Prynne’s poetry with suicide bombers, amongst other characteristic smears].

Matt Hall, ‘No Safe Harbour’, in Pornoterrorism: De-Aestheticising Power, eds. Louis Armand and Jaromír Lelek (Prague: Litteraria Pragensia, [December] 2015): 100–22 [on Andrea Brady, ‘Saw Fit’, with brief discussion of J.H. Prynne, ‘Refuse Collection’].

Adam Zdrodowski, ‘Six books of poetry in English from around the world that 2015 will be remembered for’. Scroll.in, (29 December 2015): online at http://scroll.in/article/778519/six-books-of-poetry-in-english-from-around-the-world-that-2015-will-be-remembered-for [includes J.H. Prynne, Poems [2015] among the year’s best books of poetry].

Anthony Barnett, ‘A Poet’s Fate’, in his Antonyms Anew: Barbs & Loves (Lewes: Allardyce Book ABP, 2016): 107–10 [regarding Prynne and George Oppen].

Ian Duhig, ‘Canto’, in The Blind Road-Maker (London: Picador, 2016): 24–30 [29]. [In the course of the mock-Byronic narrative: ‘Some foe was dubbed “MacSikker” by Geoff Hill, | among we dwarfish poets a Magog; | this heavyweight contender tops the bill | with Jerry Prynne, his alter ego Gog. | The outcome of their contest’s undecided still, | being fought in an impenetrable fog – | is Prynne why now your average college nerdsworth | shuns Byron to study bloody Wordsworth?’].

Sarah Howe, ‘II. To China: Du Fu’s Cottage’. Best American Poetry blog, (written 13 August 2013, posted 9 February 2016): online at http://blog.bestamericanpoetry.com/the_best_american_poetry/2016/02/ii-to-china-du-fus-cottage-by-sarah-howe.html [approx. pp. 6]. [Includes a paraphrase of an anecdote by Prynne about the biologist, musicologist and sinologist Laurence Picken].

John James, On Reading J.H. Prynne’s Sub Songs (Ashburton, Devon: QoD Press, 2016). [a serial poem in nine parts by James, illustrated by Bruce McLean and designed and typeset by Bridget Heal].

John Wilkinson, review of Alex Latter, Late Modernism and The English Intelligencer: On the Poetics of Community. Critical Inquiry website, (28 March 2016), at http://criticalinquiry.uchicago.edu/john_wilkinson_reviews_late_modernism/ [approx. pp. 2].

Peter Riley, Pennine Tales (Calder Valley, West Yorkshire: Calder Valley Poetry, April 2016): [unknown page numbers]. [‘Jeremy Prynne let me play the archlute | to your physical ear. And we would walk together | over the dark moorlands believing in something | I don’t know what.’].

Jonty Tiplady, ‘The Secret of the Anthropocene’. Unpublished draft, uploaded at https://www.academia.edu/24239848/THE_SECRET_OF_THE_ANTHROPOCENE as of 9 April 2016. [pp. 12]. Followed, briefly, by Jonty Tiplady, ‘Resistance to Climate Change: Meta-Theses from Abandoned Notes and Essays (The Secret of the Anthropocene Part 2)’, uploaded at https://www.academia.edu/24241679/THE_RESISTANCE_TO_CLIMATE_CHANGE_–_THE_SECRET_OF_THE_ANTHROPOCENE_PART_2 as of 9 April 2016, but no longer online as of 12 June 2016. [pp. 15].

Matt Turner, ‘Translating difficulty: On Ouyang Jianghe’. Jacket 2, (11 May 2016): online at https://jacket2.org/reviews/translating-difficulty [approx. pp. 7]. [Reviews Ouyang Jianghe, Doubled Shadows, tr. Austin Woerner (Brookline, Massachusetts: Zephyr Press, 2012) and Ouyang Jianghe, Phoenix, tr. Austin Woerner (Brookline, Massachusetts: Zephyr Press, 2015), with an epigraph from, and other references to, J.H. Prynne, ‘Difficulties in the Translation of “Difficult” Poems’].

Daniel Eltringham, review of Alex Latter, Late Modernism and The English Intelligencer: On the Poetics of Community (London/New York: Bloomsbury Academic, July 2015). Journal of British and Irish Innovative Poetry, Vol. 8 No. 1 (2016): online at https://poetry.openlibhums.org/articles/10.16995/biip.21/ [pp. 7].

Anthony Barnett, UnNatural Music: John Lennon & Yoko Ono in Cambridge 1969; Account of the Circumstances Surrounding Their Appearance at the Natural Music Concert (Lewes, East Sussex: Allardyce Book ABP, June 2016): 59 [reprints the final poem of J.H. Prynne, Down where changed].

Connie Scozzaro, ‘from Petra’. Brexit: Borders Kill (7 July 2016; eds. David Grundy and Lisa Jeschke, [Cambridge, UK]): [n.p.] [pp. 2]. Online at https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B4bUj-28OTSVWFdVVFFCYzc2Y1E/view . [At the bottom of the poem’s first page: ‘Iris windmills, spring | J.H. Prynne’s parties | Making ourselves thin’].

John Clegg, ‘Christmas Poetry Picks 2016’. London Review Bookshop, (December 2016): online at http://www.londonreviewbookshop.co.uk/blog/2016/12/christmas-poetry-picks-2016 [approx. pp. 3]. [‘Best Revival is jointly awarded to Shearsman bringing John Riley back into print, Sandeep Parmar’s new edition of Nancy Cunard’s poetry, and the NYRB Classics rereleasing J.H. Prynne’s The White Stones.’].

Michael Robbins, ‘Best poetry books of 2016’. Chicago Tribune, (8 December 2016): online at http://www.chicagotribune.com/lifestyles/books/ct-books-1211-poetry-of-2016-20161206-story.html [approx. pp. 6]. [the NYRB edition of J.H. Prynne, The White Stones, is one of four recommended books].

Adam Piette, review of, int. al., For the Future: Poems & Essays in Honour of J.H. Prynne on the Occasion of His 80th Birthday, ed. Ian Brinton (Bristol: Shearsman Books, 2016). Blackbox Manifold, 17 (Winter 2016): online at http://www.manifold.group.shef.ac.uk/issue17/AdamPietteBM17.html [approx. pp. 8].

Keston Sutherland and John Tamplin, ‘Transcription of a conversation in Princeton, U.S.A., 7th December 2015’. Blackbox Manifold, 17 (Winter 2016): online at http://www.manifold.group.shef.ac.uk/issue17/KestonSutherlandJohnTamplinBM17.html [approx. pp. 19]. [Sutherland discusses int. al. his friendship with Prynne, as well as Prynne’s work and its influence and reception].

Diana Bridge, ‘J. H. Prynne in China’. PN Review, Vol. 43 No. 3 [233] (January–February 2017): 16. [A poem].

Tom Pickard and Chris McCabe, ‘No Need for Permission: Tom Pickard talks to Chris McCabe about poetry and political activism’. Poetry London, 86 (Spring 2017): [unknown page numbers], online at http://poetrylondon.co.uk/no-need-for-permission-tom-pickard-talks-to-chris-mccabe-about-poetry-and-political-activism/ [approx. pp. 9]. [Pickard discussed int. al. his and Prynne’s participation and part-collision at the 1967 Sparty Lea festival].